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28

We do not know That's a bit unsatisfying as an answer, but it's the truth. Vaping is around for somewhat 13 years (invented in 2003), but the international breakthrough was so recent that no long term studies have been conducted with meaningful results. This is all there is to it. Feel free to read extracts from the studies below to get a broader ...


23

So my question is: Are smokers' lungs visibly and routinely blackened and/or discolored in the absence of lung disease? That last phrase is tricky, because smokers who have heavy pigmentation are likely to have lung disease. It is not a myth that smokers have black pigmentation in their lungs, but finding proof of gross pathology in picture form is ...


15

The OP observes: When I was a smoker, my own SpO2 was usually 100%. Although long-term smoking often does lead to changes in the lungs that cause hypoxemia (low peripheral O2 Saturation, a.k.a. SpO2), these effects are not immediate. In fact, in the short term, SpO2 may even be spuriously high, consistent with your observation. We should distinguish ...


12

This seems like a difficult question as there continues to be a large amount of conflicting reports about the extent of biological consequences regarding cannabis usage. However, There is general consensus that smoking cannabis causes irreversible cognitive impairment in children and pre-pubescent adolescents. {6} Marijuana smoke has been listed on ...


10

Smoking during pregnancy is bad. Really bad. It will be damaging to the baby, and possibly even to the mother. Firstly, smoking during pregnancy increases the risk of miscarriages. It can also cause premature birth, which can lead to many health complications, such as low weight, feeding difficulties, and breathing problems. A mother who smokes while ...


9

Smoking during pregnancy is related to many effects on health and it increases the risk in children as well. Even if the mother doesn't smoke, the risk increases significantly with higher amount of passive/secondhand smoking. These health risks include: on ongoing pregnancy: premature rupture of membranes, placental abruption (the fetus can be put in ...


9

Yes It’s zero. See: Doll, R., & Hill, A. B. (1950). Smoking and carcinoma of the lung; preliminary report. British medical journal, 2(4682), 739–748. doi: 10.1136/bmj.2.4682.739 pubmed central: PMC2038856 And their follow up papers. And pretty much the entire medical literature on smoking.


8

Smoking in general is unhealthy. Smoking can result in emphysema, COPD, pulmonary hypertension and other ugly diseases [1,2,3]. After a workout your heart and respiration rates are higher than at basal levels. Although I do not have data to back me on this, based on scientific evidence on cardiopulmonary effects [4] after a workout and the hazards of ...


8

No one can prove that quitting smoking doesn't cause frequent bowel movements in a particular individual, but it's not a symptom generally associated with quitting smoking. The usual symptoms are: Nicotine cravings. Anger, frustration, and irritability. Anxiety. Depression. Weight gain. As a former smoker, I would add increased appetite and difficulty ...


8

The question might need isolation into two parts: Nicotine addiction vs. inhaling combusted natural products Cessation and the mere use of vaped products. There should be little doubt that not habitually inhaling nitrosamines and aldehydes is probably better than doing so. In the end, however, the suggestion is equivalent to "eating boiled steak is ...


7

Passive (or secondhand) smoking can increase your risk of cancer and other health problems. Inhaled smoke is a mixture of smoke from the burning end of a cigarette or cigar and the smoke exhaled from the lungs of smokers. It is harmful and may cause a wide range of adverse health effects, particularly harmful for children. Studies show that non-smokers ...


6

There are some studied done about it. Here is the list of them Effectiveness of cigarette warning labels Perceived Believability of Warning Label Information Do Cigarette Warning Labels Reduce Smoking? Another study came up with Approximately one fifth of participants [by the way there are 616 adult smokers] reported smoking less as a result of the ...


5

Yes, SpO2 levels can be depressed in smokers, but the body will compensate for some of the effects which can explain why you may have had normal saturation levels. There are also age considerations, as well as how much a person smokes. One of the culprits in cigarette smoke is CO, or Carbon Monoxide. CO shares the same binding sites as O2 in blood ...


5

According to The Better Health Channel (independant of any business, funded by the State Government of Victoria, Australia), passive smokers are exposed to many health risks that include long-term effects. To make it short: Second-hand smoke is a danger to everyone, but children, pregnant women and the partners of people who smoke are most vulnerable. ...


5

While most studies appear to be on women who quit during pregnancy, I found a study that compared pregnancy outcomes in women who never smoked, quit smoking before pregnancy, quit smoking in early pregnancy, and those that smoked during pregnancy. It found maternal smoking cessation before or during early pregnancy appears to result in appropriate fetal ...


5

Smoking and drinking both put the recipient of the blood donation at risk or possible risk. Smoking causes nicotine to enter your bloodstream and usually breaks down into cotinine. Both of these are connected with increasing plasma Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) levels, which may be involved in the progression of both vascular disease and cancer. ...


5

Because when tobacco is smoked, nicotine causes physical and psychological dependency. You see, it acts on brain reward mechanisms, both indirectly (through endogenous opioid activity) and directly (through dopamine pathways). It actually extends the duration of positive effects of dopamine and increases the sensitivity of the brain's reward system to ...


5

TL;DR Yes, if one was to inhale the same amount of smoke passively as smokers inhale actively, it would be more dangerous. This is hardly the case though, as smokers also inhale parts of second hand smoke, and because as always, dosis facit venenum. Risk of Second Hand Smoke Risk of developing cancer Exposure to secondhand smoke raises the risk -- by ...


5

This is a common misconception - they're both terrible. Harm from smoke is mostly dose-dependent, meaning the more you smoke the worse harm you are causing your body. But if we measure equivalent quantities of smoke inhaled, cigars are usually even worse. They often don't have a filter, there's higher nicotine content, more tar... cigarettes do have ...


5

There is not enough evidence either in support or in rebuttal... EFFECTS OF CHRONIC OR REPEATED EXPOSURE: Nicotine is a teratogen (capable of causing birth defects). Other developmental toxicity or reproductive toxicity risks are unknown. The information about nicotine as a carcinogen is inconclusive. cdc.gov In summary, the findings of animal ...


4

Skin wrinkles and creases are generally caused by a breakdown of the collagen framework within the skin. Collagen is a key part of your skin's structure. It forms a network of fibers within your skin that acts like a framework. In young skin, the collagen framework is intact and the skin remains moisturized and elastic. Over time, the support ...


4

The following are studies which indicate cancer risks from third hand tobacco smoke which to me seems non-ambiguous. Sleiman, M., Logue, J. M., Luo, W., Pankow, J. F., Gundel, L. A., & Destaillats, H. (2014). Inhalable constituents of thirdhand tobacco smoke: chemical characterization and health impact considerations. Environmental science & ...


4

As suggested by one small human study and one study in mice, nicotine might improve Crohn's disease in the colon but aggravate Crohn's disease in the small intestine. Nicotine Enemas for Active Crohn's Colitis: An Open Pilot Study (Hindawi, 2008) Thirteen patients with active rectosigmoid Crohn's diseae...were given 6 mg nicotine enemas, each day for ...


4

In short: In some studies, smoking was associated with reduced risk of retinopathy only in individuals with diabetes type 2, but with an increased risk in those with type 1. In diabetes type 2, nicotine may further increase insulin levels, which may be protective against retinopathy. In this study UKPDS 50: Risk factors for incidence and progression of ...


3

Most medical literature reports a similar level of toxicity between nicotine and cyanide - 50 mg for cyanide and 60 mg for nicotine as lethal doses. However, there is controversy over the true lethal dose for nicotine (but not for cyanide). An article by Dr. Mayer in Archives of Toxicology postulates that the true lethal dose for nicotine is 10 times higher ...


3

Your question has no correct answer. It is up to take the pain for a gain. What I would do is look for other times when I can build rapports. However, studies show that non-smokers exposed to second-hand smoke are at risk for many of the health problems associated with direct smoking. Risk on respiratory system: asthma, bronchitis and pneumonia. Other ...


3

Unfortunately, you can't make a probabilistic estimate if you will contract heart disease or some form of cancer - there are too many variables to consider. How big is the room? How many people are smoking? Some people smoke all their life and die without cancer or disease - though poor lung function. But I found some interesting information, we can use it ...


3

Not too many studies showed any correlation between smoking and risk of epicondylitis but only one study mentioned it. They say: Smoking may interfere with the circulation to tendons, which not only places these tissues at risk for injury but also slows or prevents their healing during a recovery period. That former smokers are also at higher risk of ...


3

If we compare the average increase in all-cause mortality due to sitting (approximately 50% according to meta-study published on NHS) and the average all-cause mortality due to smoking (aproximately 300% increase according to CDC data), siting does not appear to be nearly as bad. Yet, because of how broadly you worded the question it is possible that ...


3

Short answer: maybe a few, but not instantly. Nicotine poisoning exists but rarely is it fatal. Especially, when it is delivered through smoking. There have been very few incidents of death by nicotine poisoning reported. References: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicotine_poisoning http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0379073809004459 http://...


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