7

The short answer is maybe, but rarely, and the whole Covid virus has never been seen to integrate into the cell's DNA intact. Any integration requires "helper" molecules not found in the Covid virus, and only very rarely found in a normal cell. It's been known for many decades that RNA in a cell can be converted into DNA and integrated into the ...


5

Trivial in concept, sure, but not necessarily trivial in practice. It's not about just producing a handful of doses in a proof-of-concept; if you want to produce a different version of a vaccine at scale it means either building a bunch of new equipment or retooling a previous production line to make the whole vaccine. Since only a minority of people are ...


2

We can't really measure vaccine efficacy outside of trials the same way it is measured in trials. In trials, you give some people the vaccine and others not, and then compare the two groups. When you start vaccinating the public, you don't have a randomized control group anymore, you have differences in the groups including A) Higher vaccination rates among ...


2

The White House reports (1) that several studies show that those with breakthrough infections of Delta had viral loads that were similar to people who were infected and unvaccinated, and that in this way, the Delta variant is different from prior strains. (I surmise SFist is just trying to communicate that SARS-CoV-2 is much more infectious in breakthrough ...


2

We have no real scientific data released yet, but here are some things to think about. Being infected, feeling sick and being contagious are three different things. Certainly, many fewer of the vaccinated are getting infected, even with the delta variant. Many fewer of the vaccinated are feeling sick even if they get infected, even with the delta variant. ...


1

Note that I am no virologist but am explaining to the best of my knowledge and for practical use from a variety of reports and my own understanding from my background in Nursing and Health Informatics. To answer your questions--the increased viral load of all variants can be infectious in both vaccinated and unvaccinated people (that is to say, it's not that ...


1

Re: If so, then there is no need to have a third booster shot. Why do you think this? Consider chicken pox/shingles. Clearly, infection with chicken pox once leads to immunity lasting for many many decades. However, that immunity can wane, allowing shingles to develop. Immunity is not an all or nothing status. Also, consider which specific variant is used ...


1

No vaccine in history has ever been 100% effective. It's not reasonable to expect it. All of the vaccines being distributed for which data are public are highly effective, though. This Q&A over at Biology.SE explains how "efficacy" is calculated in the trials: https://biology.stackexchange.com/questions/96941/what-does-vaccine-efficacy-mean ...


1

The New York Times (https://www.nytimes.com/live/2021/07/06/world/covid-19-vaccine-coronavirus-updates) presents several studies indicating good 2-dose protection against symptomatic infection: Britain and Canada reporting 87-88%, and Scotland reporting 79%. A recent report from Israel claims only 64% protection, but that report is heavily marred by lack of ...


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