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The initial Russian announcement was bluster. From the NYT's vaccine tracker: On Aug. 11, President Vladimir V. Putin announced that a Russian health care regulator had approved the vaccine, renamed Sputnik V, before Phase 3 trials had even begun. Vaccine experts decried the move as risky, and Russia later walked back the announcement, saying that the ...


12

Answering my own question since I believe I've found the answer. According to this source, The senior minister at the department, Mikhail Murashko, announced last week that a nationwide mass vaccination program is planned to begin in October. Murashko added that all expenses will be covered by the government. Therefore right now (September) the vaccine ...


6

People don't just act in response to official orders. People react to the perception of danger, and by the time various official responses were announced, they were already taking measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 (some more effective than others). For example, look at the mobility data for New York: By the time the lockdown started on March 22, ...


2

It's possible your news source confused deaths with hospitalizations, confused the cause of death, or that 2018 was particularly bad flu year in Argentina (but I rather doubt that). Peer-reviewed, albeit older publications put the flu mortality figures much lower: During 2002–2009, we estimated that influenza contributed to an average of approximately 2000–...


2

As of August 24, 2020, the jury is out on your question--Can the replication and transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 (2019-nCoV) virus in humans be inhibited in a similar way by the use of oseltamivir? It could be answered definitively only in a randomized trial. The company that manufactures Tamiflu—the branded version of oseltamivir--seems not to consider ...


1

From what I can tell, yes, both oxygen and carbon dioxide gas particles will follow brownian dynamics as they move through the air on both sides of an N95 mask. And, yes, studies (on people wearing N95 masks, not on the mask itself--which more directly answers the concern) have shown that carbon dioxide does get trapped in the mask and builds-up over time. (...


1

From a recent review of "Warp Speed" vaccine candidates General experience, combined with emerging data, suggests that the most rapidly produced vaccines (i.e., nucleic acids and virus vectors) may also be the least capable of eliciting high titers of antibodies and NAbs to the S-protein. So, it's probably a safe bet to limit discussion to those ...


1

I don't think he's referring to anything specific. "May be" is not a definitive statement, it just seems he is suggesting that it is plausible that a vaccine could be less protective than regular mask wearing. "I might even go so far" couches it even more. I think that's probably not a great statement to make, either, a better one might ...


1

The answer to this question is: "we don't know". This is because COVID-19 statistics reported by Russia may be highly questionable. This alone makes its interpretation hard, whether or not the vaccine is widely available by the time the data are published. Even by the time the vaccine is distributed widely, and regardless of its effect on COVID-19 ...


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