9

This is very good and pragmatic question. I will answer no. First of all, there are no studies to date which would have investigated the life expectancy after cholecystectomy. Of course this statement can be hardly profoundly backed up, but if you search PubMed with "cholecystectomy AND "life expectancy", none of the studies will look at this issue. There ...


7

First of all, the 1000-2500 calorie statement from the answer to this question is not due to formula inaccuracies (only 0.5% of the variation were attributed to that), but is the actual measured BMR in a study within Scottish population. Second, we know from the above mentioned question in SE that the BMR is dependent, amongst others, of fat-free body mass (...


6

In long term studies, the effects have been mixed but mild. In hemodialysis patients, after about six months - melatonin no longer seemed to have physiologic effects but could still be detected at elevated levels in salivary samples suggesting the body adapted to it. Long term (six months) melatonin in mice improved spatial learning and memory and also ...


5

Zinc oxide is an inorganic compound with the formula ZnO. ZnO is a white powder that is insoluble in water and is widely used as an additive in numerous materials and products including rubbers, plastics, ceramics, glass, cement, lubricants, foods, and as a sunblock. For material science applications, zinc oxide has a high refractive index, high thermal ...


4

Yes it can. As a general statement, I'm not sure how much it can go down before it's a problem, which is what I think you are asking as your second question. Starving to death might be seen as this taking the BMR close to zero (though I don't think you would get to zero before death). I think a good reference for this is Peter Emery's review article "...


4

There seems to be a misconception at the driving part of the question. Exercise has more effects (on the brain) than just stimulating a few synapses. That is indeed a vague and vastly incomplete conception. Since brain chemistry is by far not completely understood it is also quite premature to believe we would be able to define some kind of "optimal" ...


4

Is there any peer-reviewed scientific evidence supporting positive effects from listening to binaural beats? Yes, several. Here are two RSS feeds, which will continuously update, with research articles on binaural beats: PubMed RSS feed - PubMed (US National Library of Medicine) where "binaural beats" appears in the title or abstract of an article. ("...


4

As the saying goes, anything is a poison, it's the dose that matters. Short summary, the new 2015 US PHS standard (0.7 mg/L) or even the old one (0.7-1.2 mg/L) are below the doses at which negative effects were observed in China (2.5-4.1 mg/L), and the evidence from there is not of high quality, even though there's one meta-analysis of it. (As a cautionary ...


4

The diet consists of 24 oranges per day plus water. Nothing else. So let's see how much nutrition you're actually getting per day. Percentages are based on US Recommended Daily Intake for an adult. Calories: 1128 kcal (56%) Sugar: 224 grams Fiber: 58 grams (232%) Fat: 2.9 grams (4%) Protein: 22 grams (44%) Vitamins Vitamin A: 24% Thiamine: 192% Riboflavin ...


4

Yes, of course. Helycobacter Pylorii is a gram- bacteria which live is acid envronment, like stomach or duodenum. Common thoughts are that since stomach is acid, HP should die during time. This is not true, because this bacteria has different "weapons" to survive: -urease: this enzyme uses urea in the stomach to produce ammonia and HCO3-(bicarbonate), ...


3

Hydroxyzine Hydrochloride (Atarax, Ucerax) is a first-generation (sedative) antihistamine. Drugs of this type tend to have a pretty tame clinical profile, and it's unlikely you will experience any undesirable effects, apart from the sedation. Without knowing your medical history, it can be difficult to ascertain whether you will suffer any drug-drug or ...


3

That approach works with some supplements and not others. Iron, for example, will be held in the small intestine until the blood level lowers enough for safe absorption by which time it might just be pushed out of the body. Zing is regulated by secretions in urine and sweat. Any you ingest, or breath in (unsafe welding practices), will be absorbed by the ...


3

TL;DR: No, sunscreen needs to be re-applied every 2 hours Your product is the same as SPF 30 sunscreen SPF is a measure of how much solar energy (UV radiation) is required to produce sunburn on protected skin (i.e., in the presence of sunscreen) relative to the amount of solar energy required to produce sunburn on unprotected skin. As the SPF value ...


3

First, we can't give advice specific to an individual on Health SE. See rules. BUT what I CAN do is help guide your next discussion with his doctor. (Those are great diagrams and will help your doctor when you and your dad go to see him/her. ) The first and most important question to understand is: why was he put on Prevacid (a protein pump inhibitor) in ...


3

While official government recommendations seem to indicate a very low risk: Toxicological Risks of Selected Flame-Retardant Chemicals. (National Research Council (US) Subcommittee on Flame-Retardant Chemicals. Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 2000.) TOXICOKINETICS Absorption: Dermal No information was found on the dermal ...


3

The question implies that breastfeeding is an unpleasant and inconvenient thing that should be put up with as long as possible to give a baby "enough" benefit, at which time the box can be ticked and everyone can stop. However most families that nurse past 6 months find it a convenient and pleasant thing, so there's no particular pressure to stop. The ...


3

There are over 300 studies have found that fluoride is a neurotoxin (a chemical that can damage the brain). According to EPA scientists (United States Environmental Protection Agency), there is substantial evidence that fluoride is neurotoxin2009. They based their conclusion on studies showing that fluoride exposure during pregnancy can damage the brain ...


3

As I argue in my answer to this question, there seems to be a threshold in terms of the amount of alcohol likely to cause hepatocellular necrosis based on the production of acetaldehyde. However, alcohol causes damage to other cells in the body such as in the brain and throat. Since your example is of hard liquor, there would be damage to the mouth and ...


2

Safety of Loperamide Loperamide (anti-diarrhoea medication such as Dioraleze or Imodium) is often the go-to treatment for diarrhoea. As the medication only acts on the digestive tract, there appears to be little risk associated with long-term or frequent use of Loperamide, and the medication is considered to be a relatively safe, well-tolerated option for ...


2

The evidence for a specific timeframe beyond six months is inconclusive. Therefore: When to wean is a personal choice that has to look at the health of both: mother and child. "Individual infants must still be managed individually." Reference: Optimal duration of exclusive breastfeeding: what is the evidence to support current recommendations? DOI:10.1093/...


2

Some negative ion generators also produce small amounts of ozone, which is a gas that can be lethal if inhaled in concentration. I suppose if you were to find a way to accumulate enough ozone and then intentionally inhaled it you might die. There is no chance of this happening in normal use however, though you can smell a trace of ozone emanating from these ...


2

Links: 2016 study 2014 study They are both meta analysis. Long term effects though.


2

Albuterol is a short-duration ß2-receptor agonist (to which it owes its main effect, bronchodilation); and while it can produce some effect on ß1-receptors (producing effects such as tachycardia), these will still be short-lived due to the short-acting nature of the drug itself. More reliable exercise-induced asthma information here: http://www.uptodate....


1

Any heavy metal ( except maybe iron) is harmful when in a soluble form at "low" levels. Years ago, I had "zinc chills", "brass founders ague " etc, from inhalation of zinc oxide. I recovered quickly but I would avoid excessive zinc ( or any other metal).


1

Increased risk of disease. Heightened blood pressure. Weakened immune system and reduced effectiveness of certain vaccinations. Stress. Greater risk of death. Impaired creativity. Moodiness. Lower GPA. Poor decisions. Twitchy eyes. Fertility issues. Sex drought. Weight gain. Fat Gene activation. Emotional eating. Depression. Increased risk of car ...


1

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) produces electrical currents in the brain through EM induction. It can do all sorts of temporary things to the brain including inducing hallucinations. See for example https://www.technologyreview.com/s/418887/magnetically-induced-hallucinations-explain-ball-lightning-say-physicists/


1

Drinking one bear is actually not bad. It is called moderate drinking and in a nutshell, it is defined as consuming one drink a day for women and two for men. However, if you don’t drink now, you should not start drinking for health. A healthy lifestyle, including good nutrition and exercise, offers more benefits than moderate drinking. Another important ...


1

The chemical name for neoprene is polychloroprene and is a polymer of chloroprene. Chloroprene is suspected of causing cancer, but that does not mean that its polymer causes cancer. For instance, ethylene is a gas used to ripen, among other things, bananas, but its polymer--poylyethylene--is the basis of many plastics; ethylene and polyethylene are nothing ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible