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TL;DR Yes, if one was to inhale the same amount of smoke passively as smokers inhale actively, it would be more dangerous. This is hardly the case though, as smokers also inhale parts of second hand smoke, and because as always, dosis facit venenum. Risk of Second Hand Smoke Risk of developing cancer Exposure to secondhand smoke raises the risk -- by ...


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The following are studies which indicate cancer risks from third hand tobacco smoke which to me seems non-ambiguous. Sleiman, M., Logue, J. M., Luo, W., Pankow, J. F., Gundel, L. A., & Destaillats, H. (2014). Inhalable constituents of thirdhand tobacco smoke: chemical characterization and health impact considerations. Environmental science & ...


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Unfortunately, you can't make a probabilistic estimate if you will contract heart disease or some form of cancer - there are too many variables to consider. How big is the room? How many people are smoking? Some people smoke all their life and die without cancer or disease - though poor lung function. But I found some interesting information, we can use it ...


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Your question has no correct answer. It is up to take the pain for a gain. What I would do is look for other times when I can build rapports. However, studies show that non-smokers exposed to second-hand smoke are at risk for many of the health problems associated with direct smoking. Risk on respiratory system: asthma, bronchitis and pneumonia. Other risks: ...


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Yes, passive smoking can induce an asthmatic attack and, depending on duration of exposure, harm your lungs. There is also a publication in NEJM from 1999 (http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199903253401204) that shows that passive smoking is associated with a small increase in the risk of coronary heart disease.


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Keep in mind that surgical masks are designed primarily to protect the patient from the surgical staff, not the other way around. They prevent aerosols exhaled by the surgeons and nurses from reaching the sterile surgical field, and do very little to filter the air the staff breathes. In order to do that, you need a tight seal on the face with no gaps, and ...


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Q: "How much risk (heart disease, lung cancer, etc.) am I at exactly? Is it a negligible amount or more serious. If it is possible to calculate or estimate, how can I do this? A source would be much appreciated." A: You are at no risk of serious diseases from average exposure to secondhand smoke. According to Roger Jenkins, PhD, retired expert at the Oak ...


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Maybe this quote from a scientist who did secondhand smoke studies himself is more truthful than the first answer in the thread, which is grossly misleading. Secondhand smoke is highly diluded, by one-thousandth (1:1000) compared to the smoke inhaled directly from the cigarette by a smoker: "The most careful studies that have evaluated the actual exposure ...


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The answer to your question is thirdhand smoking (THS): From the American Nonsmoker's Right Foundation (ANRF), "Thirdhand smoke consists of the tobacco residue from cigarettes, cigars, and other tobacco products that is left behind after smoking and builds up on surfaces and furnishings." So the chemicals from smoking do stick to a person and persist in ...


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