5

Fortunately "walking pneumonia", also known as atypical pneumonia, is not a lifelong condition. Atypical pneumonia can be caused by various bacteria and viruses. The most common bacteria that causes atypical pneumonia is Mycoplasma pneumoniae. From the CDC: "Most M. pneumoniae infections are self-limiting; however, clinicians routinely treat pneumonia ...


4

We can't give personal advice but the CDC does give generic advice, and talks about people over the age of 65 with uncertain immunization status. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/pneumo/downloads/pneumo-vaccine-timing.pdf And in general, the elderly and others with impaired immune systems often require more frequent dosing of vaccines to ensure immunity is ...


3

The current guidelines for treatment of Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome do not recommend such treatment. In SARDS associated with covid-19 disease there is alveolar collapse due to infection and death of the surfactant making pneumocytes lining the alveoli. the recommendation is to generally run these patients on the dry side while being ventilated as ...


3

First, the definitions: A common cold (or "head cold") is a viral infection of the nose and throat. Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs. Tracheitis and bronchitis can be refered as a "chest cold" but not common cold (WebMD). Neither a common nor chest cold are necessary steps in developing pneumonia. You can get pneumonia without having a cold. Here's a ...


2

I think this is likely to be benign. The OP does not say how long the interval between the injections was, but let us presume it was at least several weeks. When we do catch up immunizations for infants, they often get spaced at roughly monthly intervals without ill effect. And the mechanistic idea of vaccines seems to suggest that a second dose would ...


2

From your own data 19% of patients need hospital care. Hospital care is usually required when the patient develops significant shortness of breath. Shortness of breath implies hypoxemia. Hypoxaemia is caused by a disturbance of gas exchange in the lungs. All of these patients have pneumonia with the early CT changes of upper peripheral parts of the lungs ...


2

Hyperoxygenation causes vasoconstriction and increased systemic vascular resistance. This can be good in some circumstances and bad in others. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3672526/ Overall there is poor evidence for supplimental oxygen in patients with pneumonia. Cochrane found that: "Non-invasive ventilation can reduce the risk of death in ...


2

A very recent Cochrane review of the use of Omega 3 in ARDS, not specifically from COVID-19, did not find any benefit using trials up to 2018. Conclusions: This Cochrane meta-analysis of 10 studies of varying quality examined the effects of omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants in adults with ARDS. This intervention may produce little or no difference in ...


1

The latest data on using Partial Liquid Ventilation (Total Liquid Ventilation has been shown to be unsustainable) was from a 1996 study Hirschl et al. treated 10 adults who had acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and reported a decrease in the physiologic shunt and an increase in pulmonary compliance; 50% of the patients survived in their study. ...


1

Pneumonia-causing germs can become airborne and hence spread easily from person to person. While taking care of a patient recovering from pneumonia it is preferred to use a face mask so that there is minimum exposure to airborne droplets from the patient formed as a result of coughing or sneezing. Moreover, use of hand sanitizer is advised before and after ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible