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The seasonal coronaviruses attach exclusively to cells with a ciliated epithelium. Coronaviruses invade the respiratory tract via the nose. After an incubation period of about 3 days, they cause the symptoms of a common cold, including nasal obstruction, sneezing, runny nose, and occasionally cough (Figs. 60-1 and 60-2). The disease resolves in a few days, ...


21

Overall, there has been inconsistent data on the effects of using zinc lozenges to treat the common cold. Most studies have also been done on children, which may lead to more uncertainty about its effects on adults, but some of the studies I will mention have been tested on adults. One study showed the effects of using zinc to prevent the common cold in ...


14

This is a pretty old old-wives tale, taking many forms: don't go out into the cold while it's raining, or without a hat, with wet hair, without a warm coat or scarf, without boots, etc., "or you'll catch your death of cold." The old wive's tale was immortalized by Jane Austin in her book, Pride and Prejudice, when the heroine's sister Jane falls ill after ...


11

Tl;dr - More contagious at the beginning, much less at the end. The "common cold" (or upper respiratory infection) is associated with over 200 different viral types1, and many times more than one virus is present. Because of this, there's probably no completely specific answer to this question, but it can be answered generally. Rhinovirus-caused colds (...


9

There are lots of things you can do to be a responsible and considerate individual. Props for even asking this question! Cover your cough to prevent air-borne transmission with the inner part of your arm or your shoulder- whichever come into contact with other people less. Wash your hands with water and soap regularly for at least 20 seconds. That means ...


7

No, you can't catch a cold from plants. You can, however, inhale lots of grass pollen because... we would run around and lots of dried grass dust would get kicked up. The second clue it's a pollen allergy is the short nature of it. Colds last longer than 24 hours. http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Cold-common/Pages/Introduction.aspx


7

The "common cold" is a syndrome that is characterized by signs and symptoms of upper respiratory infection: sneezing, itchy or watery eyes, rhinorrhea, cough, and sinus congestion. Malaise (the feeling of "feeling sick") is reported, but is generally more mild than with the flu. Fever is uncommon with colds. Myalgias and arthralgias (muscle and joint ...


7

This is an old wives tale. Being cold in and off itself will not cause you to catch a cold because a cold is viral. 3 However, being cold for a long time can lower your immune response and if your system was already fighting a cold then symptoms may present that were not needed before. This is because your scored an own goal when you lowered your immune ...


6

The problem with treating "the common cold" is that it's really a large collection of similar illnesses caused by completely different strains of virus. The effects are similar, but the causes are different. Any treatment for one type would likely be ineffective against many of the others. Here are some stats from a Business Insider article: A &...


6

This was answered very well by @anongoodnurse in Biology.SE question What are the effects of the common cold in an immunodeficient person? plus there was a study by Bowden (1997) which indicated that: rhinovirus was responsible for 25% of community-acquired VRIs [viral respiratory infections] among bone marrow transplant recipients. In one small study by ...


6

If I get infected once with the virus which causes a common cold, does that mean I will not get infected with the same strain of the virus ever in my lifetime? It depends on quirks of your immune system and the viral load you're exposed to, but in theory (based on vaccination and other studies), presence of the virus will trigger a suppressive response, ...


5

Symptoms, in short: Common cold: blocked nose, yellow/green mucus, scratchy throat lasting for 7-14 days (usually no headache, fever or fatigue), year round Hay fever (allergy to pollens): runny nose (not really blocked), clear mucus, itchy eyes, lasting for several weeks, mainly in spring (usually no headache, fever or fatigue) Flu (seasonal influenza): ...


5

In general a cold (usually rhinovirus), Influenza, or even a bacterial infection can have quite similar symptoms. If contracted through airborne particles, they primarily affect the respiratory system. Mucus, sneezing, fever, are all signs that the body is fighting an infection, as is fatigue as the body diverts resources to the immune system. Essentially, ...


5

I've written on this subject a few times, but the most relevant question ended up being closed, and the other is on Bio.SE, so I will mostly focus on tailoring the information there to the specifics of this question. If you look at ether of my previous answers, you will note the first thing we need to establish is what is causing the common cold. From the ...


5

My experience has been that when I, or someone in my family, gets chilled, this seems to increase the chance of coming down with a cold. I tried searching on google for this, and found this article, which says: in mouse airway cells, rhinovirus replicates preferentially at nasal cavity temperature due, in part, to a less efficient antiviral defense ...


5

I'd like to offer a different perspective. DaveL's answer is helpful if you absolutely have to carry on being a "productive" person and attend critical events for your career or life in general, all those recommendations DaveL offered will reduce the amount of people you'll infect, but chances are you'll infect people anyway because many diseases are ...


5

No, it doesn't Vaccines contain the same antigens (or parts of antigens) that cause diseases. For example, measles vaccine contains measles virus. But the antigens in vaccines are either killed, or weakened to the point that they don’t cause disease. However, they are strong enough to make the immune system produce antibodies that lead to immunity. In other ...


4

I can't address how you can avoid your body temperature rising with certain foods like almonds or raisins, as I'm unfamiliar with that issue. Soups can be eaten cold or at room temperature, and you can lower your body temperature slightly with iced drinks, quick sponge baths, etc. But controlling the most frequent causes of nosebleeds might help you reduce ...


4

I'll be answering this question in the way @DaveL edited the post. The specialist you should go to is a neurologist. They are the ones who are most qualified when it comes to seizures. In the mean time (because you'll probably have to wait before you can get an appointment), you can go to your GP and explain the problem. The way you're describing it, the ...


4

Naturally, your nasal passageways and sinuses drain down into the back of your throat - and you swallow the drainage without even realizing it. In the diagram below, it's the oropharynx where your mouth and your nasal/sinus passageways come together. Sore throats are a common symptom of the common cold. You may notice the pain more when swallowing the ...


4

It is extremely unlikely that common cold as such would kill you, but the complications could. The definition of a common cold is a viral infection of the nose and throat as reflected from its Latin names nasopharyngitis or rhinopharyngitis. It is usually pneumonia as a complication of common cold (or flu or measles...) that can be deadly. A young student ...


4

I should add here that there has been a case of ARDS reported for the alphacoronavirus 229E (i.e. a "common cold" coronavirus) in 2018. But ARDS occurrences are of course, much less common in these "common colds" than in Covid-19 infections. The case report for 229E discusses the few other such occurrences: HCoV-229E has been associated with bronchitis, ...


4

SARS-Cov-2 is a distinct virus that causes a distinct disease: COVID-19. Virus influenzae is a distinct virus (or a term for a small group of similar viruses) that causes a distinct disease: seasonal influenza or "flu." This is why you can compare death rates of SARS-Cov-2 and influenza virus, or COVID-19 and flu. "Common cold" refers to a group of ...


3

First, the definitions: A common cold (or "head cold") is a viral infection of the nose and throat. Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs. Tracheitis and bronchitis can be refered as a "chest cold" but not common cold (WebMD). Neither a common nor chest cold are necessary steps in developing pneumonia. You can get pneumonia without having a cold. Here's a ...


3

Common cold is one of the labels used to describe non specific infection of the upper respiratory tract. Other labels include acute rhinitis, acute rhinopharyngitis or acute coryza. Upper respiratory tract infections (URI) can be caused by multiple virus families such as the rhinovirus (the most common cause of URI), the influenza virus, the coronavirus and ...


3

The main concern here is whether you took more than a recommended daily and more than a recommended single dose. That being said, people are different (in body mass, metabolism, health status etc.), so we can talk about probabilities, but not give a definite answer if something will happen. The doses for acetaminophene (paracetamol): The usual adult ...


3

The thing to recognize is that until the past century, they didn't know that a cold was a virus, but may well have associated it more with actual effects caused by the cold. Indeed, this line at Wikipedia agrees with that: The name "cold" came into use in the 16th century, due to the similarity between its symptoms and those of exposure to cold weather. ...


3

I haven't been able to find anything useful about ginger, but I've found some publications about garlic and - to make long story short - there is lack of good quality evidence for its effectiveness. Some useful quotes are below. From "Prevention and treatment of the common cold: making sense of the evidence" (2014): Studies of exercise, garlic, and ...


3

Looking at this from the perspective of an infectious disease epidemiologist, the kind of person who often reads (and occasionally runs) studies of this type, I'm skeptical. A number of reasons why: The only results are a synopsis. More details and data are apparently available, but there is no manuscript, and their "Transparency Policy" has a lot of ...


3

I put a lot of trust in the Cochrane Collaboration's answer for just about any question they answer. @michaelpri cited their answer to this question, and I think it is worth posting as a separate answer: Zinc administered within 24 hours of onset of symptoms reduces the duration of common cold symptoms in healthy people but some caution is needed due to ...


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