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25

Both. Human cells largely exhibit a phenomenon called senescence - they just give up and die after they reach a certain age via a biochemical mechanism called apoptosis. The outer limit of survivability for human cells is generally understood to be in the 100-120 year range. One of the things that makes a cancer cell cancerous is the deactivation of the ...


23

So my question is: Are smokers' lungs visibly and routinely blackened and/or discolored in the absence of lung disease? That last phrase is tricky, because smokers who have heavy pigmentation are likely to have lung disease. It is not a myth that smokers have black pigmentation in their lungs, but finding proof of gross pathology in picture form is ...


12

The claim of modern medicine being responsible for longer lifespans is of course a statistical claim, i.e. the average/net effect. Thus your second assertion does not follow logically. Though it is an interesting point. Diseases, both now and in the past, do not have 100% mortality rates. If you followed the ebola outbreak you'd have heard stories of ...


7

To provide a brief answer, as I think a sufficient answer would be far beyond the scope of this site, the symptoms that are "generic" to the common colds are all caused by the body's response to a pathogen (it's why they are generic). Specific pathogens tend to cause additional symptoms on top of that, some of which seem to be directly related to viral ...


6

You picked an interesting virus (and illness) to ask about. There are still a lot of studies being conducted and many of the answers aren't in. A bit of background. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV - the virus that causes infectious mononucleosis) is a member of the herpesvirus family, very "successful" viruses in that most of the world's population are infected (...


6

Rabies is almost 100% fatal so there is no chance to develop immunity. So, post-exposure vaccination is used if the person has not been vaccinated prior to exposure. Rabies is a vaccine-preventable, zoonotic, viral disease. Once clinical symptoms appear, rabies is virtually 100% fatal. In up to 99% of cases, domestic dogs are responsible for rabies virus ...


6

Varicella zoster - you can get infected and then develop shingles recurrences which are preventable using vaccination eg Shingrix https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/shingles/public/shingrix/index.html


6

Nature Communications have such a database. Human symptoms–disease network XueZhong Zhou, Jörg Menche, Albert-László Barabási & Amitabh Sharma Published: 26 June 2014 They count the number of times a disease and a symptom keywords both appear on the same PudMed article, and assign a TF-IDF value to each pair. In their words: Acquisition of symptom and ...


5

Is there any evidence that taking a bath or shower when sick has negative effects? This is quite interesting because I've heard MANY patients with this same belief. Some people believe that bathing when sick will make you more sick. Some women do not bathe during their menstrual period because their mothers told them it would lead to some adverse effects. ...


5

This is very dependent on what one defines as a disease. There are people who only count acute conditions and/or infections as "diseases" though I wouldn't have expected a doctor to make this distinction. Under this definition, asthma would not be a disease, but a "chronic condition", for example. I found an interesting article What is a disease which ...


5

Fortunately "walking pneumonia", also known as atypical pneumonia, is not a lifelong condition. Atypical pneumonia can be caused by various bacteria and viruses. The most common bacteria that causes atypical pneumonia is Mycoplasma pneumoniae. From the CDC: "Most M. pneumoniae infections are self-limiting; however, clinicians routinely treat pneumonia ...


4

It does both. The center of the wart is weakened/killed with the acid/nitrogen(cold), while the periphery is damaged (both the wart and the skin around it). Because the wart is weakened, the body's natural reparation process slowly replaces the missing skin (under and around the wart) faster than the wart can grow, while the immune system prevents it ...


4

The answer is "of course," but one must be careful about defining terms. Certainly the infection can persist for years in untreated patients. That qualifies as "chronic." There is no question that chronic Lyme disease exists as part of the natural history of Lyme disease. If you're asking whether the infectious agent can persist after what is normally a ...


4

Is there any book or website about ALL diseases were officially registered ever? The best you're going to get is the International Classification of Disease (ICD) which is developed by the World Health Organisation. It's currently at version 10. The draft version of ICD-11 can be found here. In case you're unable to find it, just note that it does not list ...


4

N.b. My institution does not have access to this journal and the upload you made has since been deleted There are a number of ways of scoring the severity of ulcerative colitis on endoscopy; there are at least 8 in clinical use. They all take into account visible features such as vascular patterning, presence of ulcerations, the friability of the mucosal ...


4

Erm, the term chronic illness in itself isn't unambiguous, in the scientific literature it is used in different ways: The academic literature is not immune to the same kind of terminology variation. Differences in how “chronic disease” is used are largely dependent on the data used for the research and the discipline of the lead authors (i.e., ...


4

Seasonal coronaviruses come back year after year and we continue to suffer with them Researchers do know that reinfection is an issue with the four seasonal coronaviruses that cause about 10 to 30% of common colds. These coronaviruses seem to be able to sicken people again and again, even though people have been exposed to them since childhood. "Almost ...


3

there's a discussion of this point here Condition is perhaps the least specific, often denoting states of health considered normal or healthy but nevertheless posing implications for the provision of health care (eg, pregnancy). The term might also be used to indicate grades of health (eg, a patient might be described as in stable, serious, or critical ...


3

There's an App call Ada. It's only available for iOS. It's an IA based bot that ask you about your symptoms and gives you a diagnostic. It was pretty accurate with some regular illnesses. It's much more advanced than a "symptoms checker", it can for example give you opinions based on statistical data. Also keeps record of your symptoms and dates, and ask you ...


3

Is tinnitus curable? No, there is no cure for tinnitus. It is connected to a malfunction in the neurons which turn the signals from the ear into the perception of hearing. The usual cause is that the inner ear is damaged, and nobody knows how to repair this organ. You have to accept the idea that it will almost certainly stay with you for the rest of your ...


3

Since 'the cure' or rather a vaccine against the virus is still only on the horizon, affected populations have to resort to prevention measures and supportive care, once the infection breaks out. Even with a vaccine, mosquito population control and bite prevention will be necessary to control chikungunya disease. Chikungunya at the Door — Déjà Vu All Over ...


3

When you classify diseases by causes, you put a disease in a certain group according to what happens first in that disease. For example, pheochromocytoma, a tumor of the adrenal medulla, releases excessive amounts of the hormone adrenaline, which can result in hyperglycemia. So, is pheochromocytoma a malignant, endocrine or metabolic disease? It's a ...


3

My interpretation of this advice is that it is creating a necessary loophole for, say, someone's physician to state that a patient should not wear a mask. Maybe it would include people on supplemental oxygen or with respiratory difficulties. Could also include people with injuries on the face. The point is that it is vague on purpose; it doesn't intend to ...


2

While there is no single treatment to tinnitus as a variety of reasons can cause it some kinds of therapy might help ease symptoms. Tinnitus is a symptom and not a disease so it is helpful to pinpoint the underlying issue itself and then address it. My tinnitus started after I was on a anti-depressants course(Escitalopram Oxalate) and as soon as I found out ...


2

First, let me say that I highly doubt your assertion that workouts make you more likely to get ill than someone who "just goes to the office & back each day." I don't know what you base that assertion on and I think you're 100% wrong until you can provide evidence to support it. Working out and staying fit have the exact opposite effect, if anything. Why ...


2

Does chronic Lyme disease really exist ? Let me rewrite that question: "Does infection with Borrelia species persist in patients treated aggressively with antibiotics? (Treated beyond the IDSA Guidelines) Yes, just so you know I recently posted well over 100 references supporting this position on my Facebook page Thomas Grier: and here are some to ...


2

Tuberculosis and scarring That scar on the X-rays is likely a leftover from either a lymphadenopathy or a lung cavity. A lymphadenopathy is a swelling of the lymph nodes and appears in almost all patients, a lung cavity occurs in about half the patients. Most people recover from tuberculosis with no further negative effects, but some scarring may remain ...


2

No, it is not compulsory for all the patients to have/develop a scar which is most probably the pulmonary fibrosis or might be residual parenchymal lesions. In certain cases, it is due to not doing the breathing exercises while taking the standard regime of HREZ (isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, pyrazinamide) Yes, it can get better(not completely ...


2

You didn't say which country you work in, so let's take the US as an example: Do I have a right to have my medical information kept private in the workplace? Your employer has a number of ways to obtain medical information about you, whether it's because you volunteer it when you call in sick or tell co-workers, or because you provide requested information ...


2

There's nothing that does what you asked as a medical doctor would do, because a software is always a software. Anyway a good reference (there should be also a function similar to the one you asked for) can be found on http://reference.medscape.com/


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