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9

Reasoning with "evolution" and 'natural' settings is a good starting point in terms of human nutrition. But there are caveats in this: it tends to be armchair reasoning without archaeological or paleontological evidence evolution can be very quick, even for slowly reproducing and mutating humans: before the neolithic revolution humans did not eat so much ...


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Also departing from fish, hempseed oil is known to contain the optimal ratio of omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids, and does not present any health drawback to my knowledge.


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The omega-3 fatty acids will not be boiled out. The omega-3 fatty acid content of kale and spinach is mainly made up of ALA (alpha-linolenic acid). This can be seen on nutritional profiles for these vegetable, e.g. on http://nutritiondata.self.com/. It is the case for most popular plant food that the omega-3 content is mostly made up of ALA. The ...


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Individual studies often contradict each other. Systematic reviews of studies can at least filter out low-quality studies, so they may show more realistic picture. In short: Omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil supplements) may have a slight beneficial effect on cognition in those who are omega-3 deficient but not in those with normal omega-3 levels. PubMed, 2012 ...


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Fish oil is a fat. Supplements relating to fat and fat solubility have usually one thing in common: the fat digestion and nutrient extraction is usually improved when these fats are consumed like in a normal meal. But this is really just a general rule of thumb. Since real meals containing these are probably better anyway. But more important are the ...


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(ok, the text in the comment field says clearly "avoid answering...", but my answer is not a direct answer to your "which fish" question, what should I do? ^^) Perhaps using supplementary oil capsules is a better alternative: studies have found that most of the widely available supplements contain little or no mercury, dioxins or PCBs. For one thing, ...


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The omega-3 fatty acids with potential health benefits are EPA and DHA found in fish and fish oil. The omega-3 in flaxseed is alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and there seems to be insufficient evidence about their effectiveness in preventing heart disease, for example. It is true that ALA can be converted to EPA and DHA in your body, but this conversion is very ...


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I think, at this point, the answer to the question: "does ALA alone have any important/essential roles" is not yet known, but here are few hints: What is the role of alpha-linolenic acid for mammals? (PubMed, 2002) The main role of ALA was assumed to be as a precursor to the longer-chain n-3 PUFA, EPA and DHA...ALA accumulates in specific sites in ...


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In alpha-linolenic (omega-3) and linoleic (omega-6) deficiency, the production of mead acid (omega-9) in the body increases (PubMed). Judging from this fact alone, supplementation with omega-9 sounds counterintuitive. I have also found no evidence of "omega-9 deficiency" or "omega-9 supplementation benefits." Supplementation with linoleic acid (omega-6) ...


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People who are deficient in Omega-3, Omega-6 and/or Omega-9 would benefit from a 3/6/9 supplement. However it is difficult to envisage a scenario in which omega-6/9 intake would be lacking, since both are so abundant, and Omega-9 can also by synthesized in the human body. A "zero fat" diet or a survival situation perhaps. Omega-3 on the other hand, is ...


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