9

To get even close to how much bacteria there are in vaginal discharge and penile discharge, we look at how are they diagnosed/detected laboratory wise. Gonorrhea is caused by Neisseria gonorrhea a gram-negative diplococcus that is found in the discharge with pus seen in microscopy after gram staining. There are other microorganisms that are gram-negative ...


7

You have no lack of gut bacteria, that much is very safe to say. Everyone has gut bacteria in spades. The gut bacteria that you do have may not be the optimal, but no one even knows what the optimal gut microbiome/microbiota is. The study of the effects of different populations of gut flora is in its infancy. The most intensive studies are being carried out ...


7

MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) is suspected in the face of any acute staph infection that does not respond to normal antibiotics. Even staph that is more resistant to other antibiotics than it is to methicillin is routinely called MRSA. The standard test for MRSA (differentiated from other forms of staph) is as straightforward as it ...


7

This is a great question, an area of active debate, and a personal interest of mine. I actually just did a presentation on this, so this answer will probably have more information in it than you need, but I'll add it for completeness. Fever as an Adaptive Response The first important thing to know about fever is that it is something your body initiates ...


6

There are many essential oils and each can work differently and on different micro-organisms. They could affect the skin and mucous membranes in ways that are valuable or harmful. For example steam-distilled eucalyptus oil is used as a primary cleaning/disinfecting agent added to soaped mop and countertop cleaning solutions, however there are hundreds of ...


6

First problem: Blood is an organic substance, and like all organic substances that aren't cooked, refrigerated or otherwise preserved, it will rot. You'll need to freeze or at least refrigerate it. Second problem: It is a biohazard. Any diseases the donor had (known or unknown) will potentially be in that blood at infectious levels. Any bacteria introduced ...


6

In principle: yes, the gut microbiome can be altered by external exposures. It is the large but and a large range of buts that follow. The newborns indeed get their initial "seeding" by birth, vaginally preferred and from the surface of the mother's body, and everyone and everything else in the surroundings. This is facilitated by two main factors: 1. in ...


5

The aim of taking two antibiotics at the same is to prevent an overgrowth of the H. pylori strains that could be resistant to a single antibiotic. The antibiotic choice depends on the individual sensitivity to antibiotics. Various treatment regimes have been proposed: Helicobacter pylori treatment: antibiotics or probiotics (Applied microbiology and ...


5

Although the initial question seems crazy enough from the start, the preamble to this answer has to make it clear that you should not use a water boiler with tea – or anything else but water – in it. This answer has to assume that the question is about: only green tea or plain water used directly in the boiler. Doubting that there are really people so much ...


5

Just as aluminium compounds such as: Aluminium chlorohydrate, Aluminium zirconium tetrachlorohydrex glycine, and Aluminium hydroxybromid are the antiperspirant active ingredient in deodourants, antibacterials are the active aspect of odour reduction. Antibacterial ingredients work to eliminate the bacteria that cause bad odours from areas where sweat is ...


4

The safest hand sanitizer from the perspective of reducing antibiotic resistance is the alcohol-based sanitizer. It's effective against a wide variety of microorganisms. Remember, though, that hand sanitizers don't remove dirt and chemicals from your skin, and all of the ingredients in hand sanitizers are left to fully absorb into your skin. Alcohol makes ...


4

Nothing out of the ordinary, unless it is subjected to testing. Anything proposed outside of what is known about oral health and saliva is simply hypothesis. Oral health could be influenced by diet (eating certain foods are less likely to feed oral bacteria), fluid consumption, salivary flow, or any number of things. A review of saliva: Normal composition,...


4

First, I will explain what tests DO tell you the bacteria, and how they are used. Secondly, I will explain why clinicians rarely do that for respiratory infections. To test for bacteria, a sample can be taken of the body tissue/fluid that is infected - blood for bacteremia, urine for bladder/kidney infection, pus for abscess, spinal fluid for meningitis, ...


4

This sounds like dream come true for 'alternative medicine': Water-Only Fasting Can Help The Body To Fight Off Disease – And Can Have The Most Profound Health Benefits Too: A recent news item caught my attention – it concerns the therapeutic value of fasting. Researchers at the University of Southern California presented a study that explained that ...


4

Yes, of course. Helycobacter Pylorii is a gram- bacteria which live is acid envronment, like stomach or duodenum. Common thoughts are that since stomach is acid, HP should die during time. This is not true, because this bacteria has different "weapons" to survive: -urease: this enzyme uses urea in the stomach to produce ammonia and HCO3-(bicarbonate), ...


4

Credit to: No Such Thing As A Fish Podcast. On one of the latest podcasts Harkin descries that with the Mate Tea (a very fine particulate tea) you can get upstream movement of particulates. "The tea leaves climb back into the kettle" This references: http://arxiv.org/abs/1105.2585 S. Bianchini, A. Lage-castellanos, E. Altshuler (Submitted on 12 May 2011) ...


4

Extremely unlikely. This is simply unpleasant but not dangerous. The gas is mostly carbon dioxide released by bacteria in the milk fermenting the lactose sugar. Other products of the fermentation cause the foul smell. Drinking the milk is another matter, as there will usually be bacterial overgrowth and a build up of lactic acid which will cause ...


3

Common cold is one of the labels used to describe non specific infection of the upper respiratory tract. Other labels include acute rhinitis, acute rhinopharyngitis or acute coryza. Upper respiratory tract infections (URI) can be caused by multiple virus families such as the rhinovirus (the most common cause of URI), the influenza virus, the coronavirus and ...


3

You may actually want to try cutting out the mouthwash. There's some evidence that the bacteria being killed with frequent use of mouthwash may include the healthy sort that your mouth needs, not to mention that it may dry your mouth out, which will also make your breath worse.


3

The internet is overflowing with information regarding probiotics, and since these products are not registered as drugs and are widely sold as nutritional supplements, it might be hard to "separate the wheat from the chaff". I found this review which seems pretty comprehensive, and extracted some key concepts that may answer your question (they will be ...


3

A doctor mentioned Helicobacter pylori as a possible culprit for both of those symptoms. H.pylori infection is a latent infection in the human stomach mucous layer (1)(2). This infection is basically asymptomatic. This infection, however, may cause chronic gastritis. Chronic gastritis is also asymptomatic in most people. Heart burn is not a typical sign of ...


3

As has been pointed out in the comments, a common cold is already a (viral) infection. By far the largest part of upper airway infections are viral and the body is very capable of clearing them up. It is a common misconception that that the colour of the mucus gives information about whether it is viral or bacterial. This study shows that the sensitivity of ...


3

There are a number of diseases that can be transmitted through saliva. These include: Rhinovirus (colds) Flu virus Epstein-Barr virus (mononucelosis, or mono) Type 1 herpes (cold sores) Strep bacteria Hepatitis B and hepatitis C Cytomegalovirus (a risk for babies in the womb) https://health.clevelandclinic.org/2016/06/does-saliva-have-...


3

It isn't possible to completely sterilize the gut of a living person. Repeat: not possible under any circumstance in a living person. You can dramatically decrease the number of organisms by using high-dose antibiotics and flushing out the gut copiously, and by copiously, I mean your intake plus an osmotic agent is so high that you have explosive diarrhea ...


3

Unlikely. There are different viruses responsible for the symptoms grouped together as "common cold": ..................................... : Virus : Incubation period : :...............:...................: : Adenovirus : 4-8 days : : Coronaviruses : 2-5 days : : Rhinovirus : 2-4 days : :...........


3

FEVER There is still no final agreement among experts about the treatment of fever, but recently some of them lean toward not treating it unless it's life-threatening. Fever: suppress or let it ride? (PubMed, 2015): There are two basic fields of thought: (I) fever should be suppressed because its metabolic costs outweigh its potential physiologic ...


3

The normal pH range of saliva is 6.2-7.6 (PubMed, 2013). The enamel starts to dissolve when the pH of the saliva or the fluid beneath the plaque falls under about 5.5, which is known as "critical pH" (Journal of Canadian Dental Association, 2003). The pH of saliva falls, for example, when you drink acidic beverages, such as cola with pH 2.5-3.4 (PubMed, ...


3

Nasal mucus is made out of " It is a viscous colloid containing inorganic salts, antimicrobial enzymes (such as lysozymes), immunoglobulins, and glycoproteins such as lactoferrin", writes the author of the wiki page of "mucus", citing https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12037568. Glycoproteins are proteins linked by polysaccharides (complex sugars) https://...


2

There are currently no studies catalogued in PubMed (the largest repository of medical articles) that cover probiotics and overdoses at the time of this answer. (Clicking that link will rerun the search. The one result that comes up is unrelated.) Theoretically, there should be little to no danger from "overdosing" on probiotic as probiotics are supposed to ...


2

You have three separate issues here; I'll focus on how they affect bacteria in the gut. First, are different yet similar bacteria better or worse for people? Clearly yes; with various types of Escherichia coli being common and usually benign inhabitants, but E. coli O157:H7 causing severe problems. Second, can directed evolution coax a bad type of bacteria ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible