Hot answers tagged

22

Surprisingly, no. Hot water does kill bacteria, but what's comfortable for your hands is also pretty comfortable for bacteria. Most pathogens start to die off around 60°C to 70°C (140°F to 158°F)1, but water from the "hot" tap in a sink is typically below that (40° to 55°C or 104° to 131°F)2. In order to kill bacteria, the water would have to be way too hot ...


15

Remember not to drink too soon before or after a meal as the water will dilute the digestive juices While that claim might sound reasonable at first, I doubt this has any effect you need to consider for your health. There's several reasons for this: The stomach normally contains about 20 to 100 milliliters of stomach acid at a pH of around 2 to 3. To ...


13

This answer is based on normal situations (examples of an abnormal situations include patrolling in high temperatures in full protective gear, and strenuous exercise, especially in heat/cold) and normal health. I'm going to go on record here as a renegade who does not believe in an "8 glasses of water a day" (1.9 L) regimen for normal healthy people in ...


12

I don't see a lot of difference between drinking few sips and 1 cup (8 oz, 237 mL) of water at once. If you drink a large amount of water at once, for example, 500 mL (2 cups, 16 oz), all this water will be quickly absorbed and will expand the blood volume. Volume receptors in the heart will detect an increase of blood volume and will trigger excretion of ...


11

Summary The primary risk of excessive water intake is hyponatremia (low sodium level in the blood). While a healthy person who drinks 6-8 liters of water daily is unlikely to suffer significant hyponatremia, people who drink this much often have psychiatric illness that is accompanied by poorly understood hormonal changes that may indeed cause ...


9

Water isn't pure H2O; there are all kinds of dissolved substances in it: minerals, chemicals, etc. This is why scientists use only distilled water in experiments (often twice-distilled). Some impurities will boil off (some volatile organic compounds, for instance) but some will remain behind. With each boil, you lose some of the water to steam, leaving a ...


9

Short answer: A pack of raisins. Yes, I've read your question through and through. Please, bear with me for a while, to see the longer answer: The problem with concentration when you haven't eaten arises primarily because of the lack of nutrients, i.e. glucose. Glucose is virtually the sole fuel for the human brain, except during prolonged starvation. ...


8

If you are in a no-other-liquid situation then not, it's not safe to drink. The problem is that your urine is a way to remove superfluous minerals and other stuff from the body. The body's job, especially in a state of dehydration, is to remove this waste with the least amount of water sufficient to flush it away. If you then drink this urine, you are ...


8

It sounds like what you're talking about is related to water retention, a specialized case of fluid retention, which causes an effect known as edema. Edema (and thus generalized fluid retention) can be divided into two categories: generalized edema and localized edema. The first occurs all over the body, while the second occurs in only certain parts of the ...


7

Referring to published research, there is no known quota on drinking frequency since fluid intake from beverages and food in time period takes care of the total hydration status of an individual in a day. Daily consumption below the range of adequate intake of water may not produce harmful effects to the body because hydration is received from intake of ...


7

ACUTE effects of drinking distilled water The idea behind the myth that distilled water is harmful is that its low osmolality ("tonicity") could dangerously decrease the blood osmolality, which is normally: 285-295 mmol/kg. But distilled water has only slightly lower osmolality (0 mmol/kg) than tap water (~3 mmol/kg) (SGSM.ch, Table 2), so if drinking ...


5

Water intoxication is possible; it seems that realistic danger starts when you (as an adult) drink 2 liters or more water per hour for several hours in a row. In small children this amount is obviously lower, and in infants as little as 1 cup (237 mL) of water can cause intoxication. Two things to consider: Water intoxication does not occur because of ...


5

1. Freezing cold (4 °C) beverages do not increase the secretion of the gastric acid more than lukewarm or hot beverages, according to this study: McArthur KE et al, Gastric acid secretion, gastrin release, and gastric emptying in humans as affected by liquid meal temperature (PubMed). Coffee (360 mL) was infused into the stomach through a nasogastric ...


5

Is there any evidence that taking a bath or shower when sick has negative effects? This is quite interesting because I've heard MANY patients with this same belief. Some people believe that bathing when sick will make you more sick. Some women do not bathe during their menstrual period because their mothers told them it would lead to some adverse effects. ...


5

Chemically speaking, carbonated water is just plain water with carbon dioxide dissolved in it under high pressure. It hydrates just as well as normal water, because it still contains plain H2O. There are no additives. It might have a slightly larger effect on erosion of teeth than normal water because it is just a little bit acidic. The effect on the ...


5

Background reading Even though your fluid intake can be highly variable, the total volume of fluid in your body normally remains stable. Homeostasis of body fluid volume depends in large part on the ability of the kidneys to regulate the rate of water loss in urine. Normally functioning kidneys produce a large volume of dilute urine when fluid intake is ...


5

Snopes has covered this. In summary, there is no risk to boiling the same water more than once. Nothing about the water changes except the temperature. There could be theoretical risks if you increased the concentration of contaminants in the water (since some of the water is lost as steam, the concentration of anything dissolved increases), however simply ...


4

Mineral water from a glass bottle can have a good taste, is clean and does not contain fluoride (or far less than tap water). It is sodium in mineral water that is most responsible for its (good) taste. Different brands contain different (small) amounts of sodium, mostly in the range 50-200 mg/liter. You do not need to seek for "healthy minerals" (calcium, ...


4

In the attempt to prevent or treat dehydration you should not drink sea water. In short: By drinking seawater you ingest excessive amount of sodium chloride, which needs to be excreted by urine in order to maintain normal blood sodium concentration. Since the human kidneys have a limited ability to concentrate urine, the amount of water lost by urine in ...


4

Wrinkling is an adaptative response of the skin, allowing for better grasp on objects when the skin is wet. The skin is a barrier of stacked cells mostly made of keratin and lipids. It is covered in aqueous and oily secretions (sweat, sebum) containing salts, acids, peptides, squalene, steroids, etc, as well as bacteria forming a biofilm and that defend you ...


4

Drinking the appropriate amount of water is okay, but when it becomes excessive, then it could lead to some dangerous circumstances. The appropriate amount of water varies according to lifestyle. According to the popular 8 by 8 rule which says that one should drink eight glasses, each consisting of eight ounce of water, may not suit every individual. Says ...


4

The daily water requirements for a 30 years old male are in general the same as for other adults. You need to consume as much water as you lose it. A young adult loses at least about 1 liter per day -- this is the obligatory water loss, which includes the loses by urinating, invisible perspiration and breathing, but not by sweating (NAP.edu). Practically ...


4

The hazards from drinking water in Mumbai in 2012-2013 were identified as Officials said the contaminants found in Mumbai's water were sand particles, sewage water, E.coli, other bacterial content besides other foreign particles. Among the deadliest of these, E.coli can cause severe abdominal cramps, bloody diarrhoea and vomiting, said doctors. Boiling ...


4

Due to the rarity of the condition, pathogenesis is poorly understood. According to Aung, Montelibano, & Zin (2017), water may act as a solvent in aquagenic urticaria, solubilizing an antigen that permeates the skin and activates dermal mast cells. It is also possible that water may interact with sebum to form a substance capable of acting as a direct ...


4

This depends, unfortunately. And it does depend a bit on budget as well. Electric kettles used for boiling water can leach certain substances. For plastic the main concern currently is BPA leaching. What is BPA and Why Should Your Electric Kettle be Plastic Free? Do the plastic in kettles leach the toxin BPA? Why Electric Kettles Should Be ...


3

Less bad than benzene itself. The reason for this is that the alkyl groups on toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene can all be metabolized to carboxylic acids by the liver rather than oxidizing the ring directly, which creates a phenol. Metabolism of benzene to phenol increases its toxicity (to the liver). Of the cases listed I would expect cooking with the ...


3

The most severe health risk from frequent alcohol consumption are liver damage and malnutrition. There are others, see my list of sources, but I'll focus on those two in my reply. The malnutrition is mostly vitamin deficiencies: folate, vitamin B6, thiamine, and vitamin A. I think it's rather obvious that obvious that consuming more water will not help ...


3

Since there's more than one aspect to your question, I shall answer in two parts to your question: You will get 3+3=6L of water, total, half of which is water with some added sugars and food colorant. Using information from the Mayo Clinic[1], "an adequate intake (AI) for men is roughly about 13 cups (3 liters) of total beverages a day. The AI for women is ...


3

Yes, it counts. While the basic recommendation is to drink 2-3 liters (In the US, the recommendation is "8x8", or 8 8oz glasses of water per day), all fluids actually count towards that total. While making koolaid may not be as healthy as plain water, the water content remains the same, and will eventually be used in the body as such. This also includes ...


3

Water stored in jugs that are never opened could contain a dozen lethal diseases and as long as you left the jugs tightly closed they would be harmless. The danger comes when water containing Legionnaires bacteria is aerosolized, such as in a shower. So just leave the jugs closed and you can leave that water in there for years. If you really want to be ...


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