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15

Remember not to drink too soon before or after a meal as the water will dilute the digestive juices While that claim might sound reasonable at first, I doubt this has any effect you need to consider for your health. There's several reasons for this: The stomach normally contains about 20 to 100 milliliters of stomach acid at a pH of around 2 to 3. To ...


12

I don't see a lot of difference between drinking few sips and 1 cup (8 oz, 237 mL) of water at once. If you drink a large amount of water at once, for example, 500 mL (2 cups, 16 oz), all this water will be quickly absorbed and will expand the blood volume. Volume receptors in the heart will detect an increase of blood volume and will trigger excretion of ...


8

If you are in a no-other-liquid situation then not, it's not safe to drink. The problem is that your urine is a way to remove superfluous minerals and other stuff from the body. The body's job, especially in a state of dehydration, is to remove this waste with the least amount of water sufficient to flush it away. If you then drink this urine, you are ...


6

Green tea has thermogenic properties and promotes fat oxidation beyond that explained by its caffeine content per se. If green tea extract are drunk during the meal there is a proved effect of it on fat oxidation. Efficacy of a green tea extract


6

There is a myth that drinking Diet Coke while chewing Mentos causes your stomach to explode, though this has been disproved by MythBusters and Snopes. Both sources say that the reason for the explosion between Diet Coke and Mentos is because of the outside of the Mentos reacting with the Diet Coke. If the Mentos are still in your mouth, the Diet Coke will ...


5

Some vendors publish the pH values for the products they sell (examples in this answer). But that seems to be only the case if their product really stands out to the competition with high pH levels. Simple carbonated water (de-ionised) can have quite a low pH but other factors come into play for the acidity of the finished item. This brand's website has a ...


5

Chemically speaking, carbonated water is just plain water with carbon dioxide dissolved in it under high pressure. It hydrates just as well as normal water, because it still contains plain H2O. There are no additives. It might have a slightly larger effect on erosion of teeth than normal water because it is just a little bit acidic. The effect on the ...


4

Diet Pepsi is sweetened with sucralose (diet coke is sweetened with aspartame). Sucralose ha been found in studies to not affect blood sugar levels: This study demonstrated that, similar to cellulose, sucralose consumption for 3 months at doses of 7.5 mg/kg/day, which is approximately three times the estimated maximum intake, had no effect on glucose ...


4

Short and sweet (pun intended) Soft drinks generally contain a lot of sugar. As a general rule, there’s 10.6g of sugar per 100ml of Coca-Cola Classic. So the health effects of drinking soft drinks are the same as eating sugar. Not so short and sweet As a general rule, there’s 10.6g of sugar per 100ml of Coca-Cola Classic. There are 4g of sugar per ...


3

Head sweating and flushing after eating or just smelling or thinking about a certain food is called gustatory sweating. MedicineNet: Gustatory sweating: Sweating on the forehead, face, scalp, and neck occurring soon after ingesting food. Some gustatory sweating is normal after eating hot, spicy foods. Otherwise, gustatory sweating is most commonly ...


3

This research article is maybe useful: The pH of beverages available to the American consumer https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4808596/ Perrier is a 5.5 pH, albeit unflavored, and the article points out that anything over a 4.0 isn't bad for teeth. LaCroix didn't exist when it was written, so we dig farther. Temperature This one's also ...


2

You have a job that requires concentration. The caffeine and sugar in the soda provide quick concentrated "brain food". I am not passing judgement on sugar and caffeine. I eat both of these things myself, but in moderation. So you are asking for alternatives. Why don't you schedule an appointment with your doctor? Discuss your situation and family history ...


2

As you can see lemon juice is something that can adversely affect your enamel (1). Acid affects your teeth because it leeches calcium from them (2). When this happens your enamel breaks down making your teeth are more vulnerable to bacteria and plaque which then leads to decay. Pure lemon juice is not something you should be downing constantly throughout the ...


2

Hot fluids(including water) can: Relieve Nasal Congestion Prevent Dehydration Soothe Uncomfortably inflamed membranes that line the nose and throat By relieving symptoms you can make a person feel as if they are well or getting better. So yes I would say it helps. So just the hotness of the fluid can be a benefit. From a study: “The hot drink provided ...


1

Similarly to Graham Chiu, I could not find any relevant articles on PubMed. I performed searches linking viral disease and caffeine, but most were related to viral hepatitis. Instead, I decided to address the question more broadly by investigating how caffeine affects the immune response. In short, caffeine suppresses immune signalling, meaning it is an anti-...


1

At the very least, coffee (caffeine actually) can can have a complex interaction with pain medication. Caffeine can actually enhance the pain-relief effects of some medications, like aspirin, which is why it's included in some "combo" OTC painkillers in some countries. (But if you take these regularly and drink caffeinated drinks too, you may well ...


1

A search on Pubmed, and Google has found no data to support the assertion from the Viriginia Government that coffee drinking is deleterious to your health when you have the Covid-19. Unless they provide a reference I believe it is a myth. I used search terms such as covid-19, caffeine, sars, sars-cov-2. Consider also that 25-50% of people infected with ...


1

To some people, caffeine is a diuretic. You want to stay as hydrated as possible during any illness to give the body what it needs and promote a fast recovery. Since caffeine is a diuretic (to some people), it is unwise to consume liquids containing caffeine as a means for hydrating oneself. Edit: As a direct answer to the question, if you are ill, you may ...


1

We were taught in medical school that the single biggest contributor to hangovers is dehydration. The degree of dehydration is caused by the percent concentration of ETOH/ethanol which is a diuretic (i.e. it makes you take many trips to restroom.) Dehydration from drinking causes a drop in cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) pressure. This is why a hangover ...


1

That is true, in principle. A bit slower is usually at least a bit better. The same principle that differentiates olive oil grades can be applied to juices. A proper (albeit quite small) study on this seems to confirm this. Quality Changes of Fresh Vegetable and Fruit Juice by Various Juicers KSBB Journal, Volume 29, Issue 3, 2014, pp.145-154, Korean ...


1

There is no evidence that cold drinks during or after meals adversely affects health - in fact - the opposite may be true. In studies of people with pure liquid meals, the temperature of the liquid had essentially no effect on the time it took for the stomach to empty itself (i.e. digest the food). Additionally, it is worth noting that a liquid as it ...


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