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5

The American label1 says "sodium", it does not say "salt". Surprising accuracy, but it really is just that one half of the salt molecule that counts and that is counted! It's really just the sodium. Only Na and not NaCl. Sodium: What It Is The words “salt” and “sodium” are often used interchangeably, but they do not mean the same thing. Sodium is a ...


5

From the context of your question I would say no. Increasing K+ intake is alright but completely eliminating Na+ from the diet would be a bad idea. In terms of the cardiovascular diseases like high blood pressure associated with high NaCl intake,cutting down NaCl from the diet(that is making the food less saltier) or increasing the dietary intake of K+ ...


4

For a healthy individual there are 2 main ways to lose water weight: To decrease sodium intake (this may take several days to become effective). A low-carb diet that results in ketosis (in as little as 2 days). This means that you burn all glycogen you have in the liver and muscles. If you have 500 grams of glycogen stores and if each gram of glycogen can ...


3

You asked for any evidence, and we have this paper, Increased salt consumption induces body water conservation and decreases fluid intake which is interpreted in this newspaper article. Essentially, a higher salt intake does not induce a corresponding increase in free water intake. But renal excretion of water still continues at a rate higher than that ...


3

According the WHO (the organization that keeps a great list with everything that's definitely carcinogenic): "Processed meat refers to meat that has been transformed through salting, curing, fermentation, smoking, or other processes to enhance flavour or improve preservation. Most processed meats contain pork or beef, but processed meats may also ...


3

Your body should tightly control the water concentration (osmolality) via sensors in the brain (osmoreceptors) which send chemical signals (vasopressin) to the kidneys. These receptors are very sensitive and are capable of making you thirsty with only 1% dehydration. So a normal person drinking extra water will just make more urine and pee it out. An ...


2

If you take 5 grams of salt without water, your kidneys will excrete the excessive sodium in order to maintain normal blood sodium levels. Since the kidneys can excrete sodium only together with water, you will also lose some water, which will probably lead into a slightly negative water balance. If you take 5 grams of salt with 1 liter of water, your ...


2

Salt cravings can be a sign of adrenal insufficiency or Bartter syndrome[1], so you should probably see a doctor and get checked out. If you have neither of those things, then you need to learn reduce your salt intake. It is not a symptom of high blood pressure or diabetes. (Some of your coworkers have their causes and effects mixed up.) But it can cause ...


2

Your kidneys will take care of that for you. They regulate the concentration of electrolytes in your blood. Usually, enough potassium is available in your food (e.g. coffee and bananas are rich in potassium) to prevent a potassium shortage. Too much medical saline can cause hypernatraemia (too high concentration of sodium) and hypokalaemia (too low ...


2

No, your dad shouldn't see a hematologist. Hyponatremia (low plasma sodium levels) has several different causes. To mention just a few: certain medications, congestive heart failure, certain diseases affecting the kidneys or liver, syndrome of inappropriate anti-diuretic hormone (SIADH), chronic, severe vomiting or diarrhea, drinking too much water, ...


2

Assuming you are healthy, you will likely naturally regulate your sodium intake to appropriate levels. (Sodium is highly regulated by the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system.) Too low and too high are both possible, and I would not attempt to manipulate sodium intake without without measuring or calculating current intake first. If you are thirsty, you are ...


2

1) Sodium is an essential nutrient so you need to consume it regularly. The safe minimum sodium intake for individuals who do not sweat excessively is said to be 200 mg sodium (500 mg salt) per day. Recommended Dietary Allowances: 10th Edition, 1989, minimum intake for salt: In consideration of the wide variation of patterns of physical activity and ...


2

Yes, there is increase in sodium absorption levels after rinsing mouth with salt water. This absorption is through oral mucosal lining. Increase in sodium is very little as compared to the daily requirement of sodium. In the clinical study (link mentioned in question), 5% saline solution (which contains 855 mEq of sodium) was used. Sodium absorbed by ...


1

Salt that is meant for human consumption refers to sodium chloride. Both table salt and salt tablets contain sodium chloride and not just sodium. They can both contain other naturally present or added minerals. Table salt usually refers to rock salt, which is obtained from underground mines. It should contain at least 97% of sodium chloride and can also ...


1

According to Thought.co, table salt is 97-99% sodium chloride: https://www.thoughtco.com/what-is-table-salt-604008 with common additives being potassium iodide and sodium fluoride, and anti-caking agents: Calcium aluminosilicate Calcium carbonate Calcium silicate Fatty acid salts (acid salts) Magnesium carbonate Magnesium oxide Silicon dioxide Sodium ...


1

The aging process itself can cause a stiffening of the blood vessels; also our genes, etc. In general, for people with hypertension, more potassium is better. One might use a salt substitute, like "Morton's Salt Substitute", which is potassium chloride. Or drink low sodium v-8 juice, which is high in K. One might also take Magnesium citrate, or Mg-taurate ...


1

It refers to exactly what is says - Na. It would be Na not the ion. Na is not just from NaCl. It is in baking soda. Look up nutrition on table salt NaCl nutrition 100 mg NaCl has 38.758 mg of Na Which is consistent with molecular weight of 11 and 17.


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SODIUM REQUIREMENTS DEPEND ON THE SWEATING RATE Adequate intake for sodium for moderately active adults can range from 460 to 1,500 mg/day, depending on whom you ask (Nutrition Australia, USDA). You can meet these intakes without adding salt to foods, especially if you eat foods that are already salted, for example, 100 g of bread can contain more than 500 ...


1

Dietary sodium stimulates the excretion of potassium into the urine and potassium stimulates the excretion of sodium, but when consumed in usual amounts, this does not result in abnormal blood potassium or sodium levels (Harvard.edu, Bpac NZ). In salt-sensitive people, high sodium intake can result in high blood pressure. In these (and possibly other) ...


1

While salt is an essential compound that the body needs, we need less than 0.1 grams of salt per day while a very strict low salt diet will lead to intakes of the order of a few grams per day. It has been argued that people with normal blood pressure readings of 120/70 mmHg actually suffer from hypertension caused by lifelong excessive salt intake. While ...


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