Thomas
  • Member for 1 year, 10 months
  • Last seen more than a month ago
What does "parenchymal organs" mean?
Accepted answer
5 votes

Parenchyma is functional tissue, i. e. tissue that has a specific function. Organs are built from functional tissue and connective/structural tissue (stroma). In the kidney this is e. g. Gerota's ...

View answer
Can a person eliminate lactose intolerance through extended exposure?
4 votes

Very generally speaking I would say it depends on the cause of the intolerance - if it is a primary intolerance (i. e. genetic problem with lactase persistence deficiency, the enzyme for digesting ...

View answer
Why don't dentists use stitches after doing a tooth extraction?
Accepted answer
4 votes

It is not a black-and-white rule that no sutures are used in dental surgery. There are disadvantages to suturing, e. g.: Clinical disadvantages of suturing: Although suturing postsurgically has ...

View answer
Do antihistamines slow down the healing process of a bite/wound?
3 votes

On histamine: Histamine causes vasodilation, not vasoconstriction. The amount of histamine blocking agents ingested largely will not counteract the whole effect of histamine, however it may prevent ...

View answer
Is using a shield rather then a mask effective with COVID-19?
Accepted answer
3 votes

Some advantages of shields: Eyes are protected in comparison to masks (CDC considers this the main reason to wear a shield; source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/...

View answer
Are all viruses attenuated by sunlight?
3 votes

I'm a bit wary about the word "all" when it comes to medicine - what I've found with a quick Google search (GIYF): Under full-spectrum sunlight, all viruses investigated to date have been found ...

View answer
Is it possible to get Covid-19 and have 0 symptoms along the complete journey and hence cure by yourself without knowing?
3 votes

Yes, it is possible to have no symptoms and be infected, various sources, e. g. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32179137. As for testing after 'clearing the infection', this would be what a ...

View answer
What is the meaning of "presence of a diagnosis"?
2 votes

This means that the diagnosis has been made and is present. As for whether it is a common phrase, this might depend on where you are looking: pubmed.gov does find the phrase, while scholar.google.com ...

View answer
Do "a joint sprain" and "a joint displacement" mean the same thing?
Accepted answer
2 votes

You may be referring to "joint dislocation", instead of "joint displacement", which in my understanding would mean removal of the joint (at which point the two terms asked about ...

View answer
What is the percentage of woman without a hymen?
Accepted answer
2 votes

According to https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1115047/ a hymen appears to be absent in < 0.03% patients (citation of a much older paper: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/3627892/).

View answer
How does vortioxetine cause nausea when it inhibits 5HT3-receptors?
2 votes

Its primary action is as NaSSA (a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant), not as 5-HT3 inhibitor. If you have a look at e. g. the Wikipedia page (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

View answer
How do they test COVID-19 in drive-thru labs?
2 votes

I cannot answer about South Korea, but as far as other drive-in test stations are concerned the rules I've seen are: Call ahead to get checked whether testing is indicated, get issued a special ...

View answer
How does amiloride increase calcium reabsorption in the kidneys?
Accepted answer
2 votes

Regarding calcium transport in the kidney: In contrast with the proximal tubule and the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, the distal tubule reabsorbs calcium exclusively via the ...

View answer
What element of black tea is laxative?
Accepted answer
2 votes

Basically, theobromine and theophylline (see e. g. https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/Theobromine), which is similar to caffeine. There are even some people doing coffee enemas (https://en....

View answer
How can we detect if a person died to COVID-19?
2 votes

Death is the result of some kind of systemic failure in the human body. What in medicine is sometimes called "natural death" is the kind of death that seems not violent to the observers, the ...

View answer
What is the sensitivity / specificity of a symptom?
2 votes

Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sensitivity_and_specificity#Medical_examples) says: In medical diagnosis, test sensitivity is the ability of a test to correctly identify those with the ...

View answer
Can computer programmers help to find a vaccine against corona?
Accepted answer
2 votes

Yes, they can, see e. g. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30905159 (field of cheminformatics) re the possiblity of drug discovery in general via machine learning. Generally, a vaccine is a specific ...

View answer
Should I be worried about glyphosate exposure?
1 votes

Glyphosphate is an organophosphate compound that is used a herbicide - it is generally aimed at inhibiting enzyme synthesis in plants. Generally, on oral intake from raw produce can produce toxicity, ...

View answer
How healthy are hands-free stenomasks?
1 votes

With the COVID-19 pandemic some new attention has come to mask wearing pressure injuries. On a very general level, pressure injuries happen mostly to immobilized patients or those with sensitive skin, ...

View answer
Do doctors recommend that ears should be checked annually?
Accepted answer
1 votes

A regular check-up does not seem to be recommended (e. g. there is no mention of a regular ENT checkup here: https://www.entnet.org/content/clinical-practice-guidelines), assuming the patient does not ...

View answer
Confirming Individual Vaccination Efficacy
1 votes

For now the vaccines are in testing, and to some extent some validation of their efficacy will probably be necessary. Phase 1 trials check whether it is safe to check on efficacy of a drug, phase 2 ...

View answer
Derive radiation exposure from DICOM files
1 votes

I would say no, because Sievert is defined as Joule/kg (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sievert). I cannot find the patient weight or mass irradiated in the provided data.

View answer
How is the duration of an epidemic defined?
Accepted answer
1 votes

In https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/managing-epidemics-interactive.pdf the WHO defines stages for epidemics. In this file there is also this description of the last stage: Elimination or ...

View answer
How do hospitals decide whether to reopen elective surgeries during this COVID-19 pandemic?
1 votes

There is most probably no hard rule that will fit (almost) every hospital, because it depends on a variety of factors. Central hospitals with a lot types of surgery will have a bigger pressure to work ...

View answer
Signs of Anoxia?
1 votes

While theoretically hemoglobine-free blood may be "clear", it would probably be more of a milky color (have a look here for how a platelet transfusion looks like: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

View answer
How to Determine How Much Water to Drink
1 votes

No, because activity as a feature is too highly variant and there are probably a lot of other factors that would go into a formula like this. If you do a bit of research you will find that there are ...

View answer
Bike pump as a ventilator?
1 votes

Airway pressure is a lot less than what a bike pump produces during a single pump action (in the usual setting of how its used). Even though ventilators work in a similar way (cf. https://i.stack....

View answer
Why aren't purine analogs effective in non-hematological malignancies?
1 votes

It's not a given, that they are not useful in solid tumors (also lymphoma are accounted among the solid tumors). There are pyrimidine-like antimetabolites, e. g. 5-FU: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

View answer
How can there be a level of HIV viral load that will make infecting others impossible?
1 votes

As per the US CDC non-detectable viral load means effectively no transmission possible (there are not many absolutes in medical sciences). See also: https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/risk/art/index.html ...

View answer
Is astigmatism a type of retinopathy?
Accepted answer
1 votes

The cornea is in a different part of the eye than the retina, hence astigmatism is not a disease of the retina. See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_eye#/media/File:...

View answer