Hot answers tagged

7

First, please note that I am not an orthopedist, and please make note of the disclaimer in the yellow box next to your question. This is not to be construed as personal medical advice. Second, major ouch! You have my sympathy. You can tell is a fracture is healing by looking for a callus. This is a series of radiographs of a more serious tibial-fibular ...


6

CT brain at 31, what's the risk? Short answer: Very little, compared to overall cancer risk* Longer answer: Your girlfriend is concerned about increased risk of brain malignancy due to having a CT at age 31. This is something that the FDA has weighed in on in a helpful summary page: As in many aspects of medicine, there are both benefits and risks ...


4

X-rays normally contain identification markers to indicate the side, the date, possibly name and other information. It looks like you've cut part of the x-rays off but it looks like there's a treating MD's name at the top. The date could be 9th August 1939, and the 1636 a clinic ID or something else. It's not a timestamp as it's the same in both x-rays. ...


4

When reading radiographs in human health, the x-rays are read as though facing the patient. So, when you have a PA chest x-ray ( or dorsoventral view for a dog ) the x-rays enter the posterior surface, exit the anterior surface to hit the imaging surface. This used to be x-ray film. So, the right side of the chest appears on the right of the film, and the ...


4

The American Dental Association states that the overall exposure to all sources of radiation per year is estimated to be in the USA 6.2 mSv. And from an OPG which is probably similar to what you're having as 0.01 mSv. If you're a child, a young woman, or pregnant, you should ask for neck-shielding with a lead collar, or a lead apron to protect your thyroid ...


4

The amounts of radiation in today's machines is low enough that there is no negative impact to be expected. For comparison: X-Rays: A chest X-ray gives you about 10 mrem MRIs measure the reaction time of molecules (in the body) to changes of outside magnetic fields. No radiation or radioactivity is involved at all. CT-Scans: A chest CT scan clocks in at ...


3

Regarding United States, quote from "Copy Fees and Patients’ Rights to Obtain a Copy of Their Medical Records: From Law to Reality" (2005): Patients have a legal right under HIPAA to a copy of their medical records. Personal life-long medical records rely on patients’ ability to exercise this right inexpensively and in a timely manner. We surveyed 73 ...


3

Take a look at the IHE Radiology Scheduled Workflow integration profile in IHE Radiology (RAD) Technical Framework. This explains a common workflow model.


3

There are some evidences to prove that ultrasound is subjective, as there are chances of it giving false positive results as the interpretation may vary from one evaluator to the other. the interpretation can vary on the evaluator. There is also a higher incidence of incorrectly identifying a mass as cancerous, a false positive.. Reference Preliminary data ...


2

The TL;DR answer is: yes, radiation can cause cancer, but no one knows for sure exactly what the risk is of one CT scan. Radiation (especially in fetuses/children) increases the likelihood of cancer. Our information comes mostly from atomic bomb survivors, people exposed at Chernobyl, people treated with high doses of radiation for cancer and other ...


2

I was going to say no because I was under the impression there was also a component of the fragment sizes in the definition (I'm not a specialist), but in doing a bit of research I appear to be wrong. I was going to say originally it's a seemingly-open leg fracture (both bones), but according to http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00522 it is ...


1

Your first reference points out the difference between a lateral ankle view versus an oblique view. The oblique view is taken from a lateral position but the joint is tilted so that the rays travel parallel to the joint surface. Otherwise, a lateral view results in superimposition of different parts of the joint being imaged rendering it unclear.


1

X-rays are ionizing radiation, so they introduce a small risk of harm such as cancer. The risk is negligible at the individual level, especially compared with the benefit of imaging when you're sick. Ultrasound is a form of sound, so it's not ionizing radiation. High intensities of ultrasound can be used to intentionally break up tissue (therapeutic ...


1

Pisiform fractures like scaphoid fractures can be tricky to identify, and this is a good example of why! Even though I don't have a definitive yes/no answer, I wanted to answer this question as it is a good professional learning question for this site. I agree that in this case, although the feature suggesting it might be artifact (the alignment of the ...


1

I am a layman, no expert on human skulls. I do think I can likely help you feel a little less concern perhaps. The type of xray used by orthodonists typically is called a cephalometric xray or ceph. The image I see of you seems pretty typical & many seem to show some amount of a thicker area along the occipital bun on the back of the head. Here is ...


1

The risk from a single CT exposure should realistically be estimated to be zero. The commonly used "linear no-threshold extrapolation model" to get to estimates of cancer risks due to exposure to low levels of radiation (of the order of 10 mSv or less) has no scientific basis whatsoever. E.g., observations of excess cancer cases after the Chernobyl ...


1

Bottom row, second from the front, right at the gum line. See the darkened wedge-shaped area on the right edge of the tooth in the enlargement below? That is exactly what it looks like: a hole in the enamel of the tooth. That is what a cavity is and it's what it looks like on x-ray.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible