6

It depends Extended contact of urine on skin will cause skin irritation and eventual breakdown. On the other hand, that water may contain flesh eating bacteria. This is a situation of a lesser of two evils. Each wound is different and the causes numerous. The only reason you would need to "clean" a wound is if there is something in the wound that presents ...


6

It greatly depends on the wound: is it clean or infected? A cut on an abrasion? Acute or chronic. Associated with disease (diabetes), immobility (pressure) or other? Is it a burn? Honey is often overlooked. It is an antibacterial and a humectant, both helping wounds to heal better. Epidermal growth factor also helps but is not easy to get. Silver is ...


6

As a rule of thumb: anywhere that blood is coming out, you should be assuming that pathogens can be transferred in. In this situation I would smear with antibiotic ointment and wrap with sterile gauze every day (and after every shower) until the cracking-and-bleeding-with-motion stops.


5

What is reported here about the "wound care specialist" sounds like being either badly phrased by the doctor or misunderstood, misremembered or phrased rather unluckily by the OP (no offence, just speculation). Whatever the reason for this unsatisfactory status of explanation: This treatment is likely not focused on the nitrate part of the formulation alone....


5

You can look up practically any medicine that exists and you will find long lists of all of the possible side effects, risks and interactions. Manufacturers have to list everything that could possibly go wrong, in order to cover their butts legally, in this "Caution: Coffee May Be Hot!" world that we live in. Medical companies have to do extensive testing ...


4

“the wound has healed too much, and now it can’t heal anymore without knocking it back first.” I asked for more details and got a similar response back. Talking to patients is an art. This doctor lacks that art to some extent. Wounds left to heal on their own - without stitches - heal by secondary intention, that is, the wound fills in with a temporary ...


4

See this from the AAD about wound care. See this from Medscape for interesting info on wound healing. Studies are mixed whether there are clear improved outcomes from using antibiotic ointments (like neosporin) over petroleum jelly (like vaseline) on wounds that are cleaned and kept clean. There is a little more evidence for benefit in wounds acquired in ...


4

As per its description, Neosporin can be used for minor cuts and scrapes, which seem to fit well to your description of opened blister. The picture provided shows a shallow opening. I doubt something like that would be much of a concern. It would be better to cleanly cut of the loose cut skin to a comfortable level and wait for the healing process to ...


4

Neosporin has its advantages but also has way too many disadvantages. It is said to speed up healing but most cases prove that Neosporin is actually one of the antibacterial ointments behind the spread of a lethal strain of MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) called USA 300. So it'll be highly recommended to resist and desist from the use of ...


3

Never unless the wound is actively bleeding heavily, which would most likely be an extremity wound since gunshot wounds to the torso tend to do most of their bleeding internally where you can't see it and only a surgeon can stop it. Head wounds where external bleeding is a major concern are rare. With wounds to the torso you don't generally want to be ...


3

A triangular wound can possibly be sutured, depending on many considerations regarding the wound including its type, condition, location, size, shape, depth, cleanliness vs presence of debris, mechanism of injury, the force of the injury, the age of the wound, tension on the wound, the patient’s medical history, species if the wound is a bite, etc... In “...


3

Triangular blades were created for pretty much one reason, and one reason only. The triangular cross section made a stronger blade, ensuring more damage was done in a charge/stab versus a flat blade. The triangular blade was introduced in the early 1700's, mostly due to strength reasons. A triangular blade is less likely to bend/break when stabbing in a ...


3

Before I answer your question: 40 years is a very long time. Your ointment should have an expiration date. You should not use it past that date. Not just that microbiological quality can't be guaranteed after that much time (not even with phenol which might have preserved it to a point, but not for 40 years), but also the chemical composition might have ...


3

Thanks to Vance-L-Albaugh for clarifications. For deep cuts, sutures bind the subcutaneous tissue to allow it to heal properly. Since muscle lies beneath the subcutaneous tissue, it seems that sutures do NOT include muscle for lacerations. However, if you want to generalize to any suture, then the first two articles below demonstrate instances where muscle ...


2

The skin has several tasks. Among these are: defense against outside threats like infection keeping the body temperature as constant as possible keeping the moisture inside With large second/third degree burn wounds. Some or all of these functions are hampered. So we need to take care of these until the skin is cured. The most important is of course to ...


2

What is shown continuously on television and movies is that they either die fairly quickly, or, if you apply pressure, then get the bullet out, the patient will recover. That's not the case. The single best way to treat a gunshot wound to the abdomen is to get the person to a hospital as soon as possible. Even if you have IV fluids at your disposal, there ...


2

I think alcohol is better than peroxide for the reasons stated above. Nevertheless, from an evidence stand-point, there is no really strong evidence for basically any solution over the other or even for whether to clean or not clean wounds. Personally (and what is preferred by most in daily practice and generally recommended in guidelines as well) is ...


2

In venous lacerations, blood would be able to be stopped by placing a tourniquet below the injury. By stopping the blood from returning from the limb, you wouod be able to effectively prevent blood loss. This would work in the rare case of just the vein being cut, but it's safer to place the tourniquet above the injury in case the vein is not the only thing ...


1

That sounds a bit too broadly defined a question to answer with a general yes or no. Once a scar is formed it is difficult to remove, if not impossible. Cutting out scar tissue produces another scar. The outcome of this might be worse. Although quite promising, your second link qualifies: "The skin healed almost without scarring […]" Scar formation ...


1

Depending on your definition of "wound" you could consider a styptic pencil. It's generally used for nicks and small cuts, such as you get while shaving. Most drugstores sell them or you can order from Amazon. They are briefly mentioned in the Wikipedia article on agents that stop bleeding. The article mentions several other products that are probably only ...


1

An open blister should be treated as a wound because the skin is open. There is something called second skin or hydrocolloid dressing that is ideal because it mimics most of the function of the outer skin. Unfortunately it is expensive. It is often used for open blisters on feet during a walking event when the walker want to continue walking (before taping ...


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