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Frozen vegetables are just as good if not better than fresh vegetables at a grocery store, provided that the vegetables are frozen immediately after harvest. There are many online articles that point to this, but here's an example from a recent NY Times article: Nutrient level differences between fresh and frozen produce are so minor they aren’t likely ...


4

Answer to first question: There've been conducted medical studies concerning effects of apple eating on lipid profile of hyperlipidemic (having increased concentration of fats in blood) and overweight men. Authors claim that: Consumption of Golden delicious apple may be increased serum TG and VLDL in hyperlipidemic and overweight men. here's link to the ...


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Fructose intake from any source, including fruits, does not seem to be unhealthy until consumed in usual amounts. Fructose intake >100 g/day can increase LDL and triglyceride levels, which are risk factors for coronary heart disease (2008, 2013). It is hard to get >100 g of fructose/day just by eating fruits but easier by drinking certain beverages. Fruits ...


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The article itself doesn't make such strong claims. ... we conclude that the consumption of fish/vegetable meals appears to lead to only marginal increases of human cancer risk. And that only based on a few theoretical assumptions. You can e.g. also assume that for cancer to develop you need the immune system to miss some problems which may be far less ...


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The recommended balance between 5 servings of vegetables and 2 servings of fruit is only one of different recommendations, for example, Dietary Guidelines for Americans by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture recommend 2.5 cups of vegetables and 1 cup of fruits per day in a 2,000 Calorie diet. On that same page, you ...


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Your diet would be exceptionally devoid of vitamin C which exposes you to the risk of scurvy which can occur in 1~3 months, and used to be universally fatal. Death occurs from intracranial hemorrhage, and seizures. https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/125350-overview I've only seen that in long distance lorry drivers on a diet of meat pies. In ...


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Well not only are carrot colors other than orange still good for beta carotene (although some do have considerably less - purple still has an orange core though) things like kale, which are not at all orange, have a lot of beta carotene. for serving size, there is more Vit A in kale, than carrots. Sweet potatoes are also higher. For a very easy ...


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Minerals are not destroyed by cooking, but a large amount of some minerals, especially potassium, can leak into the boiling water. This can be prevented by steaming - cooking above instead in the boiling water. More than 50% of some vitamins can be destroyed by cooking; the percent increases with cooking time. Source: Nutritional Effects of Food Processing ...


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A common cause of bloating is consumption of high amount of soluble fiber, which is fermentable by normal intestinal bacteria, which produce gas. From your list, Brussels's sprouts and avocado have more soluble fiber than kale, spinach and cabbage. Other examples of foods high in soluble fiber (potentially bloating): Legumes: beans, peas, lentils Fruits: ...


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Unfortunately, no-one can give you a definitive answer here. As mentioned, there have been cases of diverticulitis in low or no-fibre diets, but it is not known if the lack of fibre was the cause. There is a growing movement led by Dr. Shawn Baker of people following a 'carnivore' / all meat diet, many claiming to have exceptional results. But then, of ...


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EDIT: Question: Why the Daily Amount of food from each group does match up to the weekly recommended amounts? Answer: The daily amount is for calories, which means that for individuals who consume 1,000 Cal per day (every day, so 7,000 Cal per week), Guidelines recommend 1/2 cups of dark green vegetables per week. Calories are listed as per day, because ...


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