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5

Yes, anal sex is the most risky method of sex with the highest possible chances for HIV infection. This is clearly said in the official Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website: Anal sex is the riskiest sexual behavior for getting and transmitting HIV for men and women. As for the reason, it's neither the penis nor the anus directly. They ...


5

One systematic review (1) conducted in 2003 examined the efficacy of several complementary and alternative therapies (including douching with sodium bicarbonate) for yeast vaginitis and bacterial vaginosis Here an extract of their abstract: Inconsistencies in definition of vaginitis, type of intervention, control groups, and outcomes prevented ...


3

Acellular dermal matrix has been used experimentally [1,2] to successfully repair vaginal agenesis in cisgender female patients, so there's some evidence to support that ADM could be used in an SRS vaginoplasty. It's important to note that these authors are from institutions in China, which may mean that their surgical technique is region-specific (and ...


3

Major Edit: Corrected extremely incorrect stats The vagina, being "designed" (evolutionary speaking) for intercourse, has a lining which is reasonably good at fending off pathogens, particularly viruses like HIV. If there are no breaks in this lining (such as from rough sex), the risk of contracting HIV from a single sexual encounter with someone with a ...


3

No it is not normal. She should have an examination. The usual cause of this is a friable (bleeds easily) cervix. It is not dangerous, but needs to be evaluated. I am a gynecologist. If the cervix is infected, it may bleed even with gentle intercourse. An examination would find any worrisome areas on not only the cervix but anywhere else in the vagina or ...


1

During birth, the pelvic floor is stretched significantly, and the stretch is probable to never get back to the way it was exactly before. The NHS states it takes a few days for the swelling and openness [...] to reduce [...] after your baby is born. An interview on the independent says that it should at most take 6 weeks for the vagina to get roughly back ...


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