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46

https://vaers.hhs.gov/data/dataguide.html provides a useful guide for interpreting these data. VAERS deaths are not causal reports, they're just a report where someone (doctor, family member) decided to fill in a form. Most are likely to be coincidences. These links are posing the question "well if these are just coincidences, why are so many the day ...


9

The HPV vaccine is most effective when preventing you from initial infection. While common, it's possible you haven't been infected with HPV. Even if you are, there is some benefit to still being vaccinated if you're HPV positive. The reason for this is that there are a number of different types of HPV virus, and the vaccine should provide you some ...


7

VAERS has a useful purpose, but in high profile situations such as this the data is often more reflective of data collection issues rather than actual effects of vaccination. In addition to the reasons mentioned in another answer (people are more diligent about reporting incidents after the COVID vaccines because they are new and notable), note that VAERS ...


5

A few-year-old review that might be useful is: Pardi, N., Hogan, M., Porter, F. et al. mRNA vaccines — a new era in vaccinology. Nat Rev Drug Discov 17, 261–279 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1038/nrd.2017.243 The tricky part of creating an mRNA vaccine once the "platform" has been developed remains exactly what mRNA sequence do you put into it? ...


5

This question is clearly answered by the CDC's "Myths and Facts about COVID-19 Vaccines" Will getting a COVID-19 vaccine cause me to test positive for COVID-19 on a viral test? No. None of the authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines cause you to test positive on viral tests, which are used to see if you have a current infection.​


4

we will never know that the vaccine have a probability to kill of ~0.1% Very unlikely given that randomized trials with thousands of participants have been conducted; one meta-analysis pooled 41,141 patients but "None of the included trials reported any cases of vaccine-associated mortality".


4

The CDC gives this as the reason why not: Aspiration before injection of vaccines or toxoids (i.e., pulling back on the syringe plunger after needle insertion but before injection) is not necessary because no large blood vessels are present at the recommended injection sites, and a process that includes aspiration might be more painful for infants. [citing] ...


3

The most obvious reason why a vaccine may have limited use is mutation. Flu vaccinations are only useful for a season since the dominance of the many Influenza serotypes changes pretty quickly over time, and new serotypes are routinely spun off through mutation. The other likely reasons for needing boosters is differences in average immunological memory ...


3

There is no "authoritative document" like you ask for. The FDA doesn't set concrete standards for efficacy and safety; rather, they review applications for vaccines and other drugs on a case-by-case basis according to safety, efficacy, other available treatments, and severity of the condition. The FDA has issued guidance to industry about how they ...


2

The White House reports (1) that several studies show that those with breakthrough infections of Delta had viral loads that were similar to people who were infected and unvaccinated, and that in this way, the Delta variant is different from prior strains. (I surmise SFist is just trying to communicate that SARS-CoV-2 is much more infectious in breakthrough ...


2

We have no real scientific data released yet, but here are some things to think about. Being infected, feeling sick and being contagious are three different things. Certainly, many fewer of the vaccinated are getting infected, even with the delta variant. Many fewer of the vaccinated are feeling sick even if they get infected, even with the delta variant. ...


2

From the links you've supplied, none of these other vaccines have gotten further than phase 2 trials yet. Most seem to only have phase 1 trials started or merely planned so far. These vaccines are not yet available because they have not completed clinical trials that demonstrate safety and efficacy.


2

TLDR: in the actual paper/preprint, neither for the raw antibody values nor for the ratio relative to day 1 is there a statistically significant difference between Moderna-after-Moderna and Pfzier-after-Moderna. Well, if the first pdf you linked to is the study all sources talk about, in that one 3x Moderna elicited higher antibodies than anything else... ...


1

The Center's for Disease Control and Prevention provides recommendations for all vaccines appropriate for adults. For HPV: Age 15 years or older at initial vaccination: 3-dose series at 0, 1–2 months, 6 months (minimum intervals: dose 1 to dose 2: 4 weeks / dose 2 to dose 3: 12 weeks / dose 1 to dose 3: 5 months; repeat dose if administered too soon) In ...


1

Note that I am no virologist but am explaining to the best of my knowledge and for practical use from a variety of reports and my own understanding from my background in Nursing and Health Informatics. I think it is worth answering because the reasoning comes up a lot with skeptical friends and family who might question if it's even "worth" getting ...


1

The New York Times (https://www.nytimes.com/live/2021/07/06/world/covid-19-vaccine-coronavirus-updates) presents several studies indicating good 2-dose protection against symptomatic infection: Britain and Canada reporting 87-88%, and Scotland reporting 79%. A recent report from Israel claims only 64% protection, but that report is heavily marred by lack of ...


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