New answers tagged

0

No downside known so far. Getting a booster shot after having received the Johnson & Johnson's Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine has been more thoroughly studied, as summarized in https://abcnews.go.com/US/jj-vaccine-doses-start-fauci/story?id=80620642 The data, which is not yet peer reviewed, also found that for J&J recipients, antibody levels were higher ...


0

"Equal viral load" can be rather misleading because it refers to peak measure at one point in time and in one spot (in "the nose", more precisely by nasopharyngeal probe.) There are a couple of counterpoints to this: At least, in monkey [models] of re-infections with SARS-CoV-2, there's differential response in the nose and in the lungs ...


3

Clinical Trials Initial safety data comes from the pre-approval clinical trials, as summarized by Male (2021): Note that pregnant women were not enrolled in the trials, and participants were asked to avoid conception, so these numbers are presumably of accidental pregnancies. Just eyeballing the results, there is no obvious difference in fertility or ...


0

You've answered your own question: ...the way our bodies develop protection and possible side effects are generally similar whether vaccines are given alone ... "Alone" (i.e. not at the same time) is what you're asking about. Regarding vaccines given together at the same time, that's OK too. According to an updated news story, the CDC has ...


0

Yes, it is safe and highly recommended to get a flu vaccine, with at least two weeks between getting a COVID vaccine (of any kind) and the flu vaccine, as mentioned here: And the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises that the flu vaccine is more important than ever this year, because it not only protects you and the people around you from ...


3

There is a 2016 study (Larson et al.) on 67 countries (Africa is underrepresented, but the rest of the continents have decent coverage). Regarding education it found that Any level of education elevates pro-vaccine views for importance, efficacy, and religious compatibility but not for vaccine safety. (I've cropped the table to the relevant part. It has ...


3

Carpiano et al (2019) found that lower parent education is associated with higher odds of being concerned about measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination. Kumar et al (2016) discuss the link between vaccine hesitancy and the level of parental education. SES [socioeconomic status] [(parent education, household income)] differences in KAB [knowledge, ...


Top 50 recent answers are included