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What are the outcomes of uterine rupture? Treatment of uterine rupture is surgical. Goals are stopping the hemorrhage, delivering the baby, and repairing the uterus if possible. The range of risks is similar to the range of risks of a cesarean delivery (infection, blood loss, thromboembolism, hysterectomy, organ injury, adhesions, extended hospital stay, ...


4

Laparoscopic coagulation of endometrial spots itself is one of the clinically approved treatment for endometriosis. Though by evidence-based medicine the evidence for laparoscopic treatment can vary from low to moderate (depending what symptoms patient has). Mirena is a hormone releasing intrauterine device for which evidence is moderate by evidence based ...


3

The rupture of the follicle is totally painless as it is not innervated. However, some women experience ovulation pain. It is particular to one side, and the mecanism that cause pain are not fully understood. It is maybe due to the excessive size of the follicle that stretches the ovary or to irritation the abdomen. On mayo clinic . com, it is said ...


3

I would say consult a doctor to confirm the problem. Removal of the Uterus usually doesn't cause to much of a shift, but I am sure there are a very few instances when it does. The uterus typically takes up a very small space in the abdomen or pelvis. After a hysterectomy, the other abdominal organs shift slightly to fill the space. During the surgery,...


2

Heave menstruation can be a pathology, which is called menorrhagia. There is a multitude of medication available: NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or naproxen sodium (Aleve), help reduce menstrual blood loss. NSAIDs have the added benefit of relieving painful menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea). Tranexamic acid (Lysteda) only needs to be ...


1

Making an assumption of a diagnosis of a such serious condition as endometriosis and starting with treatment that can have potential severe side effects without making the actual diagnosis is not serious for a doctor. Abdominal adhesions from other causes, like PCOS or pelvic inflammatory disease, can cause similar symptoms. And there are other much more ...


1

During birth, the pelvic floor is stretched significantly, and the stretch is probable to never get back to the way it was exactly before. The NHS states it takes a few days for the swelling and openness [...] to reduce [...] after your baby is born. An interview on the independent says that it should at most take 6 weeks for the vagina to get roughly back ...


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