17

It is likely you are not hearing the ultrasound itself (typical frequencies are upwards of 1 MHz, far beyond what the human hearing system is capable of detecting). You are probably hearing coil whine from the electronics -- switched-mode power supplies in particular tend to operate towards the upper end of the hearing range, and the intensity of this sound ...


6

Sounds like science fiction and not much use for treating patients. They talk about shining laser light on the virus to induce the resonant frequency to shatter the virus. But, Covid-19 is a deep tissue infection, and I can't imagine how lasers could possibly get inside the lung, heart and other tissues affected by this virus.


6

Your thought process is correct; in the absence of all other factors, physics dictates that the reduction of pressure surrounding a flexible fluid-filled vessel would result in expansion. But there is an even stronger force: venous return, which is the flow back to the heart from peripheral circulation. (Resource linked is from the author of the cardiology ...


5

There are two major issues with eating. Swallowing and digesting food allows air to get into the digestive tract. Air is a barrier to the ultrasound waves so renders tissues distal to the air invisible as the ultrasound will reflect off the tissue air interface Food can cause the gall bladder to contract pushing its contents into the small bowel. A ...


5

Your question contains several parts. How is the process of the transvaginal ultrasound different than just a regular ultrasound? I imagine it's inserted into the vagina? Is it quite painful? What you call a "regular" ultrasound is known in medical practice as an transabdominal ultrasound. It is a very common procedure, which, depending on the ...


5

UpToDate has a couple (1) (2) pretty good articles discussing current research and recs on the use of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). As it is behind a paywall (which some hospitals pay for, so you might be able to access it at a local institution), Medscape has a couple good articles as well (3) (4). I cannot accurately speak for national or international ...


3

In the US, medical device sales are regulated by the FDA much like drugs. Like drugs, some items are permitted for over-the-counter (OTC) sale to the public (for example, bandages and thermometers). Others can only be sold to medical professionals. Diagnostic devices that require a professional to interpret are very unlikely to be available OTC. Other ...


3

There are some evidences to prove that ultrasound is subjective, as there are chances of it giving false positive results as the interpretation may vary from one evaluator to the other. the interpretation can vary on the evaluator. There is also a higher incidence of incorrectly identifying a mass as cancerous, a false positive.. Reference Preliminary data ...


3

Regarding United States, quote from "Copy Fees and Patients’ Rights to Obtain a Copy of Their Medical Records: From Law to Reality" (2005): Patients have a legal right under HIPAA to a copy of their medical records. Personal life-long medical records rely on patients’ ability to exercise this right inexpensively and in a timely manner. We surveyed 73 ...


2

You're right: their description contains redundancy. I think the reason for the extra clarification may be to make sure readers understand that the method does not involve X-rays (which are ionising, and hence more dangerous). I've seen people confuse them with ultrasound, because both methods are used for seeing through tissue, their results look similar ...


2

Fetal gender determination is suprisingly accurate, according to this study: Accuracy of sonographic fetal gender determination: predictions made by sonographers during routine obstetric ultrasound scans The results state the following: Results confirmed 100% accuracy in predictions made after 14 weeks gestation. The overall success rate in the first ...


2

It is not recommended to reuse opened gel bottles for internal use due to the risks of infection. Ultrasound gels for internal use should be sterile unopened gel packets. And there was a series of cases who developed infections from one manufacturers gel. 1 You can of course make your own ultrasound gel which from the ingredients looks very safe. Mix 2 ...


1

X-rays are ionizing radiation, so they introduce a small risk of harm such as cancer. The risk is negligible at the individual level, especially compared with the benefit of imaging when you're sick. Ultrasound is a form of sound, so it's not ionizing radiation. High intensities of ultrasound can be used to intentionally break up tissue (therapeutic ...


1

Precisely to emphasize the safety of ultrasound and to point out that you or your fetus will not be subjected to any sort of radiation as it may be the case in some of the other popular imaging methods besides ultrasound.


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