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My short answer is : Brushing your tooth without toothpaste will not cause a greater amount of micro-scratches than if you were to use toothpaste. To begin, tooth paste, is a product most often made of abrasive substances that increases the scrubbing power of the toothbrush bristles. Some kinds of toothpaste can also accomplish other things, such as ...


7

The previous answer does not refer to clinical studies so I thought I would have a look. TLDR; the clinical studies I've seen suggest not to rinse with water after brushing. According to Doméjean, et al. (2018), you should not rinse after brushing. For maximizing the topical effect of the fluoride toothpaste, patients should be encouraged to spit out ...


6

Flouridated toothpastes are poisonous but as with anything our good friend Paracelsus comes into play here: All things are poison, and nothing is without poison, the dosage alone makes it so a thing is not a poison. By spitting the excess toothpaste out you are simply avoiding ingesting it in sufficient quantities to cause adverse effects. The advice ...


4

The short answer is NO The long answer is: If time is of concern, ask your oral health professional whether an electric toothbrush can improve your cleaning enough so that 2 minutes of brushing are sufficient. As stated in another question on Health.Stackexchange: it is the physical movement of the bristles of the brush that removes plaque that ...


4

No. As asked "modern toothpaste" is very good for you. "Good" defined here as: Modern toothpaste is designed to help you keep a happy smile into old age with your natural teeth. It should help to keep your teeth, and everything in your mouth, really, clean, fresh and healthy. This is the short answer. And that is a bit too simplistic, alas. The longer ...


3

If all the rest is the same, your risk of caries would increase by 25% Source: Cochrane Syst Review.


2

This is usually seen in clinical settings: a child is left with an untreated enamel caries. Then the lesion progress and the lesion is cavitated. The dentin then start to react, ocludding the dentinal tubules. When the saliva (+ minerals) reach the dentin, the caries process start to slow down and the dentin change from dark brown to almost black. At the ...


2

First of all: even brushing with nothing – except the dry brush – is better for dental hygiene than doing nothing at all. Before the invention of the tooth brush people were actively caring for their teeth. One interesting example is found in the "toothbrush tree", which has a number of beneficial attributes. To address the questions: Abrasiveness is ...


2

Summary: Not rinsing after tooth brushing may somewhat increase the effectiveness of fluoridated toothpaste, but the evidence is inconsistent and the effect can vary greatly among individuals. One possible explanation for inconsistent effect: not rinsing after brushing appears to be only beneficial if you are at a high risk of getting cavities. Researchers ...


1

Being an very mild abrasive charcoal is indeed used since ancient times to clean teeth. This behaviour is seen among the natives of Africa and Digitalia even now. Examples for recent use in Africa: Oral health related behaviors among adult Tanzanians: a national pathfinder survey. and Oral health practices among pregnant women in North Eastern Nigeria. ...


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