12

Frankly, medical terminology isn't necessary and might even lead to increased confusion, especially after being translated. All medical terminology is not universal. Just state your complaint in plain language as clearly as you can using layman's terms. I doubt that a Japanese doctor needs much more guidance from you than simply understanding your ...


10

These are not really synonymous. Despite some sites claiming them to be. Compare the usage on this site. Lipaemia is describing lab artifacts, that is roughly too much fat in the blood sample that interferes with other tests and measurements. Hyperlipidemia is what is wanted to get measured in a blood sample, that is lipo-proteins or roughly: cholesterol. ...


9

Answer: 1 Kilocalorie equals 1 Calorie. Note the capital "C". 1 kilocalorie equals 1000 calories. Note the lowercase "c". So Calories and kilocalories are pretty much the same thing. Kilocalories It's easy to get confused about calories and kilocalories since, in a nutrition context, values are actually given for the number of kilocalories in a food, ...


9

Because the context refers to a serum sample, and it sounds like a low quality one, you should use lipemia (or, the british variant lipaemia), not hyperlipidemia. See here for an example of the context where this is used. Hemolysis, icterus, and lipemia (HIL) in patient specimens may interfere with the accurate measurement of various analytes


9

Adrenaline = epinephrine. Different name, same chemical. "Adrenergic receptors" is perhaps where things get more confusing. That is a family of hormone receptors (α1 α2 β1 β2...) that respond to endogenous hormones including epinephrine and norepinephrine, and medications that are adrenergic agonists. Colloquially, people might say "adrenaline" to ...


7

Paresthesia Anxiety Symptoms -- seems like the term/condition you are looking for (though I am not a doctor and am not diagnosing you as such -- I'm just trying to inform you of the term you might be looking for). In this Wikipedia entry on Paresthesia, it describes the sensation as such: Paresthesia is an abnormal sensation such as tingling, tickling, ...


7

Generally speaking, 1 kilocalorie = 1000 calories (definition here). But the confusing part is explained here: The energy used in physical activity and the energy stored in foods is actually given in kilocalories (the heat energy required to raise the temperature of one kilogram of water by one degree Celsius). Often kilocalories are referred to as kcals ...


7

Although it would be helpful if we knew what sort of pathology report this was, I surmise that it is likely describing analysis of a biopsy or surgically removed tissue specimen from a breast cancer. In breast cancer, it has long been known that some but not all tumors express hormone receptors, particularly estrogen and progesterone. Although the mechanism ...


7

Right Diagnoses. Com It means secondary to. From your question: Patient has respiratory weakness secondary to multiple sclerosis If you are looking for a more credible source, this site mentions that it means "secondary to." Meded.uscd.edu also mentions its meaning.


7

As a practicing epidemiologist, I'm actually a little puzzled as to the down-votes for this. The difference between an outbreak and an epidemic is pretty subtle, and neither is all that terribly well defined. The answer: There's not much of a difference. The CDC agrees with me: Occasionally, the amount of disease in a community rises above the ...


7

Mr. Hiroyasu Yamashiro wrote an anwer: Thank you for your question about the paper. The meaning of the abbreviations you ask is as follows. Thank you. Sp - Supraclavicular lymph nodes Ps - Parasternal lymph nodes Hiroyasu Yamashiro


7

Receptive aphasia is a type of aphasia in which patients have difficulty understanding ("receiving") words as opposed to difficulty speaking them. There are more than one possible etiology and it is not diagnostic for a specific pathology, but may suggest something wrong with the temporal lobe due to epilepsy, TIA/stroke, brain damage, medication, or ...


7

A full radiology report typically contains several sections, similar to a progress note. The "HISTORY" section discusses the medical history and possibly indications for the imaging. Here, r/o means neither "has been ruled out" nor "should be ruled out in the future". It means the patient has such and such a history and this imaging test was done in order ...


7

Although the term "contractility" can refer to contraction of any muscle, including skeletal muscle (e.g. biceps) and smooth muscle (e.g. muscles in arterial walls), in medicine contractility usually refers to cardiac contractility, which in most fundamental terms is the force with which the heart muscle squeezes. According to the textbook Regulation of ...


7

I think it would depend on the particular context, but at least in Hubert et al 2000 the meaning is fairly clear: This was a 2-year study, with 14-, 29-, and 53-week interim necropsies and a 106-week terminal necropsy. Before study initiation, 20 rats/sex/group were selected to be euthanized at each interim necropsy; all remaining surviving rats were ...


6

The "Townsend deprivation score" measures socio-economic status, and has five categories, hence you are being asked for your quintile. The scale is 1-5, and it incorporates the variables car ownership house ownership unemployment overcrowding of the household Since it needs to be standardized you can't just calculate it for yourself. 2001 Townsend scores ...


6

The causal sequence indicated here doesn’t make a lot of sense to me. Having signed many death certificates, I can sympathize with the doctor who signed off on it. Generally, these have to be typed up in a form (in my experience, on a typewriter....). Someone other than the doctor usually does that, which means there is some verbal communication between the ...


6

To get an understanding of the difference, look at a disease that has been in the news recently, Legionnaire's Disease. Legionella pneumophilia is a bacteria that is responsible for most cases. It lives in stagnant water under certain conditions, and is inhaled when aerosalized. This is the etiology of the disease, which is basically how it infects the host,...


6

More or less: Yes. Acute and chronic are ways to classify diseases according to duration. Acute*: Acute Illness (1) Any illness that develops quickly, is intense or severe and lasts a relatively short period of time. (2) Any condition—e.g., infection, trauma, fracture—with a short (often less than 1 month) clinical course. Acute illnesses usually ...


6

You are correct that carcinoma refers to types of cancer arising from epithelial tissue. Definition of carcinoma: Cancer that begins in the skin or in tissues that line or cover body organs. This includes tissues that line both the inner and outer surfaces of the body and that arise from cells originating in the endodermal, mesodermal or ectodermal ...


6

"Clinically" in this context means "by doctors in the clinic" in their normal practice. It excludes research contexts, and implies "real-world" circumstances. There is no implication here of the "clinical diagnosis" definition added to the question. Lab results/imaging would still be clinical assuming they were ordered ...


5

I only partly agree with previous answer and would like to contrast some of the points suggesting that "muskuloskeletal disorders is a term used in occupational medicine". According to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10) of the WHO (which is used by hospitals, health prof. and ...


5

Since the OP is asking for definitions, maybe it is OK to be nitpicky. Pathogenesis is the process by which harm has occurred. Pathology is the study of harm, including the study of pathogenesis. Etiology is the investigation of causes. Doctors are most interested in the causes of harm, not in the causes of neutral or good outcomes, so most medical ...


5

Diagnosis of exclusion A diagnosis of exclusion (per exclusionem) is a diagnosis of a medical condition reached by a process of elimination, which may be necessary if presence cannot be established with complete confidence from history, examination or testing. Such elimination of other reasonable possibilities is a major component in performing a ...


5

According to Collins Dictionary: Workup is a complete medical study of a patient, including a thorough examination, laboratory tests, a survey of the patient's case history, etc. On eMedicine you can see an example of a workup for gallstones.


5

Yes, and that the recommended interval for dosage is twice daily. The convention for BID (twice daily) dosing is to write "400 mg twice daily" to indicate the dosage at each administration. Therefore it would be 400 mg + 400 mg = 800 mg total daily. With some medications, the dosage is listed as daily total, divided into BID or TID dosing. For example, "...


5

One may use anatomical terminology as in if the injury is on that side of a digit which is near to the midline then one may say that the medial side of fourth finger was injured. The other side which is away from midline is the lateral side. More specifically there are other terms eg anterior posterior, to indicate the front or back surface of a hand/finger. ...


5

In general in these situations the medial/lateral terminology is used, however in case of hands/feet due to the ability to pronate and supinate this might lead to confusion, therefore specific terms "radial, ulnar" are preferred. ...for clarity, the sides are named after the bones. Structures closer to the radius are radial, structures closer to ...


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