8

"Gamekeeper's thumb" - named because of the chronic injury incurred when rabbit keepers broke rabbits' necks between the base of the thumb and index finger - has more recently been referred to as "skier's thumb", now the most common acute mechanism of the injury. If you fell on an outstretched hand hyperextending your thumb (did it feel as if the thumb was ...


5

Source 3 is a book sponsered by Cyanotech Corporation claiming beneficial effects for the human health using Astaxanthin. The author is employee of Cyanotech Corporation. There is a small chapter regarding beneficial effects of Astaxanthin for the tennis elbow, but is is only referring to source 1. I did not find anymore studies referring to the effects of ...


5

Have a look at this publication of Sein et al., 'Reliability of MRI assessment of supraspinatus tendinopathy.' (PMID 17289860) Sein ML et al. Reliability of MRI assessment of supraspinatus tendinopathy. Br J Sports Med. 2007 Aug;41(8):e9. Epub 2007 Feb 8. https://dx.doi.org/10.1136%2Fbjsm.2006.034421


5

There's no way to be sure from such scant information, but it would quite possibly be this one: Autologous Tenocyte Implantation in Patients With Chronic Achilles Tendinopathy (ATI)


5

The pictures you posted are simply light microscopy of tissue (and prepared quite well). For a source, just look at the illustrations to Wikipedia's histopathology article and see for yourself what this type of picture looks like. Even if you could get a non-invasive imaging from a patient with that resolution (and I don't know of any which can do that, not ...


5

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is numbness, tingling, weakness, and other problems in your hand because of pressure on a nerve (median nerve) going through your wrist. {1} Pressure or swelling of the median nerve causes CTS and making the same hand movements over and over may induce swelling. The swelling can get even worse if the wrist is bent down (your ...


5

Purely anecdotal, but I've never seen good results from pushing tendinitis (and bursitis, and really any connective tissue inflammation). Decades of (amateur) athletics have taught me that the magic to treating tendinitis is to identify it early and stop aggravating it. A little bit of tendinitis is a lot easier to work through than a lot of it. In the "...


4

As previously said, this is dependent on the product. However, there is at least one study available comparing the bioavailability (which is what you are asking about - in this case, how much diclofenac permeates into the skin) of several of these patches and the differences don't look too big to me. Patel, Kunal N., Hetal K. Patel, and Vishnu A. Patel. "...


4

As I mentioned in this answer, icing is not meant to heal tendinopathy. It is supposed to be a painkiller. It can have some effects that may feel like they are fixing the problem though. The cold ice forces blood vessels to contract which can help reduce the inflammation. This might be considered healing, but the tendinopathy is still there, until the tendon ...


4

A quick look through the medical literature leads me to the conclusion that there is no evidence that CBD promotes healing of tendinopathy. The anti-arthritic effect in your referenced paper is based on an immune-mediated inflammatory response which is different to the mechanism of inflammation in traumatic tendinopathy. This paper deals with a mechanical ...


3

A torn muscle will not stagnate: it will attempt to heal itself, although this process can result in poor outcomes if the native structure isn’t well-aligned during healing (e.g. when surgical repair is required). As this repair process occurs, the tissue is unstable, and “re-aggravation” refers to interrupting healing by exerting stresses on the injured ...


3

I am quite sure that there is no valid study to address your question per se. First of all it seems that topical NSAID is pretty much the only some way effective treatment for lateral epicondylitis. Many other treatment modalities show no real effect. A recent meta-analysis in CORR (1) pooled all treatments from valid RCTs and the combined net effect was ...


3

Not too many studies showed any correlation between smoking and risk of epicondylitis but only one study mentioned it. They say: Smoking may interfere with the circulation to tendons, which not only places these tissues at risk for injury but also slows or prevents their healing during a recovery period. That former smokers are also at higher risk of ...


3

A big difference here is due to the structures involved. Mature tendons are composed of cartilage and contain a very poor blood supply. They rely on localized synovial fluid for tissue perfusion and nutrition as opposed to simply a connecting blood vessel. Epicondylitis (lateral or medial) is a chronic from of inflammation caused over time by repetitive ...


3

You should probably go to a physical therapist. Physicals therapists are more specialized in that they will treat the actual injury and its source. "Occupational therapy (OT) addresses patients' impairments and functional limitations with the purpose of increasing their capability to complete activities of daily living (ADLs)." Occupational therapy is more ...


3

Basically, something falls under the classification of "inflammed" based on the following five criteria: Redness Swelling Heat Pain Loss of Function If any of these apply to your tendinopathy, then it is probably tendinitis. Otherwise, it's probably non-inflammatory.


2

Basically this depends of the product you use. Your question does not give enough information to provide a "curve", as this has many variants including the produc you use, skin temperature(!), humidity and other influences. Read product instructions. These patches are generally made to provide a more or less constant uptake of the used drug, so in a perfect ...


2

Here's my (non professional take), from reading and listening to Jill Cook and Steven Low: TL;DR: Tendonitis/tendinosis are obsolete terms. If someone uses them, they are probably 10 or more years behind the times. The current one is tendinopathy. Tendinopathies provoke little or no inflammation, and we still have a long way to understand them. In ...


2

Tendinopathy is a type of tendon disorder: Traditionally, tendons have been considered to be a mechanism by which muscles connect to bone as well as muscles itself, functioning to transmit forces. This connection allows tendons to passively modulate forces during locomotion, providing additional stability with no active work. The difference between non-...


2

I found a 2017 article pointing specifically to a case of AAS usage associated with a Bilateral Patellar Tendon Rupture, which mentions: we suppose that combined AAS and exercise can increase tendon stiffness, predisposing to the rupture Additionally, one of this paper's sources references a 2016 study in which they point out that: Bilateral ...


1

Easy answer is simply "we don't know". The burden of proof is on the manufacturer, who probably will never spend the millions to know. But since it is a nutritional agent, one does not have to substantiate claims, just print it up and sell em. But if you think eating collagen will help joints and tendons, you must also believe that eating teeth will help ...


1

Moshiri et al (2017) talks of Cissus quadrangularis with osteoporosis and mentions Cissus quadrangularis in relation to Osteobolin-C. Osteobolin-C is claimed to aid in the repair of joint, muscle, bone and connective tissue. The compounds found in osteobolin-C allow for the rapid mobilization of fibroblasts, chondroblasts and osteoblasts to the injured ...


1

I performed a search of PubMed and found no studies for "cissus quadrangularis" and "tendinopathy". Looks like at this point there is no scientific evidence one way or another.


1

Of course. Icing helps by numbing the pain sensation, thereby providing relief. If iced continuously it would lead to tissue damage with exact same effect of exposing your skin to below freezing temps. Frost bite but from within. Tried to ELI5 as much as possible. Hope it helps.


1

Try this: "Evidence of healing of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears following arthroscopic augmentation with a collagen implant: a 2-year MRI follow-up" Source - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27331028


1

Depending on your age, clinical treatment with rest, physiotherapy, NSAID, epicondylitis, both lateral and medial, may take one to several months to resolve. Surgery is a last resort and should be reserved to those cases where there is complete rupture of a tendon.


1

"FQs have chelating properties against several metal ions (e.g., calcium, magnesium, aluminum), and have been known to cause direct toxicity to type 1 collagen synthesis and promote collagen degradation" We aren't for certain as to why FQ's have this effect yet, but this fact would be the leading candidate in my opinion as to why.


1

There's a paucity of experimental human data on this topic. Rodent studies such as this one http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21117902 show that glucosamine might improve healing and strength of surgically divided tendons. That might be completely irrelevant to humans.


1

You can use an ultrasound probe with power doppler to look at blood flow to see if there is increased blood flow present that would be compatible with an inflammatory process. And, neovascularization demonstrated by power Doppler may be present in more painful lesions http://pubs.rsna.org/doi/full/10.1148/radiol.2272012069 but currently it's not possible ...


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