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7

Not necessarily. Here are some examples that aren't good candidates for closing with sutures: A wound that is much wider than it is deep-- a bad road rash abrasion, for example. A wound with extremely fragile or messy margins (I treated a patient a few weeks ago whose food processor turned on while her hand was in there scooping food out). A wound that ...


2

I am not familiar with the particular media you have referenced, but there are many suture techniques that have been taught to generations of medical students from Ethicon (a manufacturer of sutures) with their Knot Tying Manual. As someone credentialed in many surgical procedures, but not actually a surgeon, I will admit that neither of the terms used are ...


2

Sure, it could be an allergy to vicryl, but if it wasn't itchy, it probably wasn't. You probably saw some granulation tissue, normal in healing, expecially visible if you're poking around in an incompletely healed incision. If you want to know if you're allergic to Vicryl, simply ask your doctor to place one stitch somewhere on your body where your skin is ...


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The article you cited answers your question. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Craniotomy The amount of skull that needs to be removed depends on the type of surgery being performed. The bone flap is then replaced using titanium plates and screws or another form of fixation (wire, suture, etc.).


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Vicryl takes many weeks to hydrolyze and absorb (56-70 days per Ethicon data), and in the process it can generate a foreign body reaction from the body. The body does one of two things for foreign bodies: 1) pushes them out or 2) walls them off. Inflammation and foreign body reaction are not allergic responses. Please go back to your surgeon and ask for a ...


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