7

Actually, I am a frequent flyer (I think I spend at least 10% of my year in an airplane or an airport) and I discussed the problem of sunlight with my treating physician. First, sunlight has an impact on the circadian rythm (which involves the secretion of melatonin, cortisol, control of body temperature) which regulates your wake/sleep cycle. The effect ...


6

The sunlight through the window does not stimulate vitamin D synthesis in the skin. Sunlight and Vitamin D (PubMed): Since glass absorbs all UVB radiation, exposure of the skin to sunlight that passes through glass, plexiglass, and plastic will not result in any production of vitamin D3 in the skin. The sunlight reflected from the surfaces, ...


5

The statistic is false, though there's something meaningful behind it. From Godar et al, 2003: Since 1986, people have been informed that they get about 80% of their lifetime ultraviolet (UV) dose by the age of 18. This belief originated from the mathematical conclusion that diligent use of sunscreens (sun protection factor 15 or higher) during the first 18 ...


4

There are a few mechanisms at work that influence the vitamin D status for Europeans. Vitamin D is either eaten in the food, created with the help of sunlight or supplemented. Many appear to net have enough it: Humans get vitamin D from exposure to sunlight, from their diet, and from dietary supplements. A diet high in oily fish prevents vitamin D ...


4

I like your curiosity and logical thinking - you're just missing a few pieces of the puzzle. The sun emits ultraviolet light radiation which is the component of sunlight that is able to damage skin. Ultraviolet (UV) is a form of electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths between 10 to 400 nanometers, shorter than that of visible light but longer than X-rays. ...


3

According to a paper published by the principle investigator, Dr. Brash, who was interviewed in the article linked in the question: We document the ability of [acetyl zingerone] in vitro to prevent dark‐CPD formation in melanocytes within the first few hours after UVA exposure Thus, Dr. Brash appears to be investigating such compounds. In the manuscript, ...


3

As critiqued in comments, this answer possibly misrepresents the vitamin D situation, which is better described here. Proceed with suspicion! Summary Because of the associated cancer risk, protecting your skin from sunlight is a good idea, also when swimming, and especially by wearing UV-absorptive clothing. Sunscreen makes a huge difference too. You can ...


3

This has been a controversial question for many years. The current evidence suggests that sunscreen does block a part of Vitamin D production, but with negligible amounts. Studies have found that by blocking ultraviolet rays, sunscreen limits the vitamin D we produce. But the question is to what extent. A few studies have concluded that the effect ...


2

Something that is worth mentioning right out of the gate is a febrile seizure (see also The Epilepsy Foundation). These are sudden seizures, generally experienced by young children, resulting from an especially high fever. The generally accepted (although not fully confirmed) mechanism is via something called respiratory alkalosis (see e.g. Mazarati (2007)). ...


2

The Skin Cancer Foundation covers this: [A]fter the sunburn fades, lasting damage remains. Sunburn accelerates skin aging and is a leading cause in the majority of cases of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. The later went on to say: Skin damage builds up over time starting with your very first ...


1

Ideally, people should get enough vitamin D from their food. However, that's difficult to do, Many folks don't get enough of the nutrient from dietary sources like fatty fish and fortified milk. Ref: here It's not known exactly how much time is needed in the sun to make enough vitamin D to meet the body's requirements.Ref.here This is because there are a ...


1

In addition to the other answers: [C]linical studies have never found that everyday sunscreen use leads to vitamin D insufficiency. In fact, the prevailing studies show that people who use sunscreen daily can maintain their vitamin D levels. One of the explanations for this may be that no matter how much sunscreen you use or how high the SPF, some of the ...


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