Hot answers tagged

10

First of all, I am going to stay quite “general” as I understand you are not from the field. The aim of my post is really to provide some clarifications to your question. There are two types of strokes: ischemic (approx. 85%) and hemorrhagic (approx 15%). As you are speaking of “blood accumulated in the brain” I understand that you mean hemorrhagic stroke (...


7

A large study of ~8000 patients suggests there is no real benefit to prophylactic oxygen supplementation after acute stroke (Roffe et al., 2017). American Heart Association/American Stroke Association guidelines (Powers et al., 2018) are for oxygen only for hypoxic patients, with limited evidence of benefit but no evidence of harm. Hyperbaric oxygen is only ...


6

I can offer a UK perspective on this, using guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE): Cardiovascular disease: risk assessment and reduction, including lipid modification. There is also a useful summary here. You mention the case of secondary prevention in cardiovascular disease (CVD), when statins are used in people ...


5

Unilateral carotid compression (Carotid Compression Test) is an important procedure before performing vascular surgery for either of the carotid arteries, because during the surgery, they need to be compressed upstream for obvious reasons. Numbers vary, but in 6%1 to 26%2 of patients, the compensation through the circle of willis was insufficient: Forty ...


3

Following were independent risk factors found in the large Interheart study (http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736%2804%2917018-9/abstract): 1. Smoking 2. Diabetes 3. High blood lipid levels 4. High blood pressure 5. Abdominal obesity 6. Psychosocial stress 7. Lack of regular physical exercise 8. Lack of regular fruits and ...


3

Sometimes, stroke may be associated with insomnia, not because of the brain tissue damage, but because of how it affects someone's life. Insomnia is a likely long-term side effect of stroke, study finds (ScienceDaily, 2018): Importantly researchers found that although sleep efficiency was reduced in patients, total sleep time between the groups was ...


2

In a typical ambulance operating at the paramedic level in the US, the following vital signs might be recorded: Heart rate Respiratory rate BP SpO2 GCS EtCO2 Pupil size The last two would be uncommon and only found with certain patients. It's likely there would be more than one set of vitals if the transport time is longer than a few minutes. As for size, ...


2

The amount of blockage depends on factors that are somewhat random as they depend on many things that can sometimes be more in one artery and less in the other. WebMD - Clogged Arteries Plaque that accumulates on the inner walls of your arteries is made from various substances that circulate in your blood. These include calcium, fat, cholesterol, ...


2

According to this case report, Testing should be considered if the patient is not meeting goals of rehabilitation, because altered taste perception may lead to depression, weight loss, and malnutrition, all of which may act to confound rehabilitation efforts. I could not find research about directly re-stimulating the taste buds, but at the very ...


2

So far I have found Dilated Virchow-Robin (VR) Spaces (a.k.a dilated perivascular spaces) which are not necessarily malign and have pretty much the exact aspect on T1 and T2. Ref: https://pubs.rsna.org/doi/full/10.1148/rg.274065722


1

I think this is probably due to selection bias, but I cannot find a source from someone in the field to reference. Instead, to support this conclusion, note that in the review you reference, the people with near-occlusions overall have fewer negative outcomes than those with lesser occlusions. People who are not already dead while having such a blockage ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible