6

So this was an interesting one for me, because I never seriously tried to consider it. Most online sources that claim this say it's an "old army trick," but after reading several perspectives on wound care in the military, I don't know that is true. The actual historical roots on this idea I could find actually go back to reference a slave owner using it ...


5

A triangular wound can possibly be sutured, depending on many considerations regarding the wound including its type, condition, location, size, shape, depth, cleanliness vs presence of debris, mechanism of injury, the force of the injury, the age of the wound, tension on the wound, the patient’s medical history, species if the wound is a bite, etc... In “...


4

Triangular blades were created for pretty much one reason, and one reason only. The triangular cross section made a stronger blade, ensuring more damage was done in a charge/stab versus a flat blade. The triangular blade was introduced in the early 1700's, mostly due to strength reasons. A triangular blade is less likely to bend/break when stabbing in a ...


3

Thanks to Vance-L-Albaugh for clarifications. For deep cuts, sutures bind the subcutaneous tissue to allow it to heal properly. Since muscle lies beneath the subcutaneous tissue, it seems that sutures do NOT include muscle for lacerations. However, if you want to generalize to any suture, then the first two articles below demonstrate instances where muscle ...


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