29

I think a missing bit of information that might help you get a better sense of this practice is: steroids are miracle drugs. OK, that was in jest - no miracles here. Truth be told, though, if there is a single class of drugs that has added more quality-adjusted life-years to human history than any other, steroids must be competing with just a few ...


20

One of the primary purposes of corticosteroids is to suppress immune activity and inflammation: that's exactly why they are used in asthma. Of course the immune system has an actual job besides causing nuisance inflammation: fighting infection. For some infections, the harm to the infected person caused by the immune reaction itself is worse than that of ...


8

Good question! The missing bit of information here is that topical steroids are usually not absorbed systemically at high enough levels to cause adrenal suppression. However, they sometimes are. I shall explain. First of all, regarding the relationship between systemic corticosteroid administration and adrenal insufficiency, please see this answer. The ...


6

This is a very good question. Simply put: among doctors we call them wonder drugs or life saving drugs. In a number of emergencies, such as severe drug reactions, life-threatening asthma or allergies, or inflammatory conditions (such as your example of arthritis), no other drugs act like steroids. They act quickly and effectively, reducing inflammation and ...


6

This question arises from your (correct) understanding that administration of exogenous (i.e. not produced by the body) glucocorticoids (GCs) can suppress the body’s ability to produce its own GCs in the adrenal glands. In order to understand the answer, a little background is necessary. Why does the body become unable to produce cortisone? As in many ...


5

One study published in 1996 in the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicince said that there are insufficient published data to determine the comparative risks and benefits of corticosteroid injections. Most side effects are temporary, but skin atrophy and depigmentation can be permanent. In a further study published in 2002 in Foot and Ankle Clinics we read: ...


5

Steroids are used as treatment for acute attacks/flares in many diseases because they reduce inflammation. In multiple sclerosis, they are given to reduce inflammation of the nerves that occurs when the immune system attacks the nervous system. This inflammation may be one mechanism that causes the nerve damage in multiple sclerosis, although this seems to ...


4

Dexamethasone and other steroids have well-documented psychological effects. There are so many citations available that it's not necessary to pick one in particular. The definition of "psychoactive" as used in medicine is "affecting the mind or behavior." Therefore, his usage was correct.


4

In a dexamethasone supression test, it is measured whether given the patient dexamethasone leads to lowered cortisol levels. Lowered cortisol levels are the normal response to dexamethasone; if the level doesn't go down as much as it should, that can point to one of several conditions that cause Cushing's syndrome (see below). There are standard and ...


3

I'm sorry to hear about your recent psychosis. The mood/psychological effects of glucocorticosteroids are well documented. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=22764363 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=22424158 Throughout the reading, you'll note that many of these symptoms are transient ;however, the truth is that your healthcare providers (...


3

There are numerous causes and sources of irritation for Asthma exacerbations. Your objective is finding out whether it's irritants (smoke, chemicals, lint, etc) or allergies (pollen, pet dander) that is setting you off. Once you identify the source, you can then take steps to prevent it. It also appears that you've been exposed to poor air quality for a ...


3

Effects of cortisone ie. glucocorticoids (GCs) are very variable. One effect of GC is the inhibition of collagen formation. Collagen is the main ingredient of tendons. Collagen units form the backbone for tendons and makes them as strong as they are. As every tissue in human reproduces all the time so do tendons by forming new collagen as the old molecules ...


3

I'll start off by highlighting a couple of more general studies: Cole & Schumacher (2005): A general study of corticosteroids, this found that some corticosteroids may be free of side effects (specifically, intraarticular corticosteroids) for a series of short-term injections for a short amount of time (one injection every three months for two years). ...


2

Unfortunately the answer to your question is we simply do not know. There have been no trials of antihistamines or corticosteroids for ACEI associated angioedema and these treatments are of unproven efficacy and may be ineffective, despite often be used as standard therapy. http://www.racgp.org.au/download/documents/AFP/2011/December/201112andrew.pdf


2

I've found a supporting source for the fluid retention claim, in an excerpt from Holland-Frei Cancer Medicine, 6th edition (from 2003). This separates the effects on the kidney into two categories, depending in part on the drug: mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid. Mineralocorticoid effects include Loss of potassium and hydrogen Increase in extracellular ...


1

Corticosteroids block the enzyme Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) which catalyses the first step in arachidonic acid synthesis pathway. But, NSAIDs blocks activity of cyclooxygenases (COX 1 and COX 2). So, by blocking this pathway at first step completely prevents the formation of of Arachidonic acid, but when this pathway is blocked later at step performed by COX ...


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