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Scientific studies of individuals who have died of starvation are thankfully uncommon. However, an analysis of the literature published in 2001 provides evidence of a sort of "minimum BMI" required to sustain human life. A BMI below 13 in males and 11 in females may be the lowest limit compatible with life. In that regard, all other things being ...


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The currently recognized world record in fasting - by drinking only water and taking multivitamin supplements - is 382 days by a 27 years old man who went from 207 to 82 kg in this time (Postgradual Medical Journal, 1973, Wikipedia). This was a medically supervised experiment and should be considered a gross exception. For a healthy adult with normal ...


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This answer was initially written to describe different effects of few/frequent meals in everyday life. The part about rationing foods in a "being stranded" scenario is at the bottom. 1. Eating vs working time. Eating until full means you will probably have only few meals per day, so you will be in the "digestion mode" only for some time around the meals. ...


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I'm going to approach this from a strictly physiological stance. With all of these diets available it can be very confusing. Ketogenic, Atkins, Paleo, etc.. The body uses glucose for energy. Many, many, many compounds we eat are complex and large. Our body utilizes each of these in a very efficient manner. Short Answer: YES! We have a "starvation" ...


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Nails, hair, teeth and bones in general are not edible. The ears and the larynx are difficult to digest. Muscles are easy to remove and are also nutritious. The liver is rich in nutrients and vitamins, easy to chew and swallow and, provided you haven't missed your anatomy classes, not very hard to remove. The same applies to blood clots and the ...


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Starvation/fasting does lead to physiological changes that recently are being investigated as an adjunct to chemotherapy for cancer control. The dietary recommendation for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, as described by the American Cancer Society, is to increase calorie and protein intake. Yet, in simple organisms, mice, and humans, fasting--no ...


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I found a pretty good article here that discusses starvation mode pretty intelligently and cites valid research. In short, yes, starvation mode exists, but it will not cause a person to gain weight, at least while being starved. However, once a person who has triggered their starvation reflex is allowed to eat normally and at will, they lose their sense of ...


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