9

There are quite a few things you can do to "reset" your sleep schedule, as shown by this WebMD article. However, be aware that due to your own circadian rhythms, that may not be the optimal pattern for you. Some of the suggestions include: Bright lights - Use bright lights around you when you first get up. Dim lights - Conversely, use dim lights in the ...


6

Studies have linked oversleeping with Cognitive impairment Depression Increased inflammation Increased pain Impaired fertility Higher risk of obesity Higher risk of diabetes Higher risk of heart disease Higher risk of stroke Higher all-cause mortality You can find the detailed article here: http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/guide/physical-side-effects-...


5

Actually lack of sleep leads to weight gain and not weight loss. Losing out on sleep creates a viscous cycle in your body, making you more prone to various factors contributing to weight gain. “The more sleep-deprived you are, the higher your levels of the stress hormone cortisol, which increases your appetite,”. When you’re stressed, your body tries to ...


5

As far as I know, there's no medical term for a person who does such a thing (and I doubt it would be labelled a disorder since practically everyone can do it to some extent), but the 2nd part of the act that you're talking about (i.e. sleeping longer after a shorter/insufficient sleep before) is often called recovery sleep, while the term for the first part ...


5

Yes, it can. The "master clock" of your body is the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. It receives: Neuronal input from the retina, through the retino-hypothalamic tract. Hormonal input, as the suprachiasmatic nucleus expresses melatonin receptors. Melatonin is a hormone secreted by the pineal gland in response to the absence of light. The pineal ...


4

Your question demonstrates a key understanding of homeostatic mechanisms: in many cases, long-term pharmaceutical modulation leads to compensatory changes that blunt the effects of the modulation. This can lead to rebound effects and sometimes physical/physiological dependence. Your hypothesis is good, however, you have the mechanism wrong in this case. ...


4

It is difficult to know if your friend will experience adverse health affects associated with shift work, as everyone has different levels of tolerance for the effects of shift work. Shift work however has been shown to increase the risk of some adverse health effects. The following is a list of adverse health effects that have are commonly associated with ...


3

Generally, NREM phase 3 (N3) also known as deep sleep, is considered to be the sleep phase in which the body rests the most and people suddenly awakened during this phase may have unpleasant sensations and feel confused inmediately after waking up as noted by the National Sleep Foundation. A typical sleep cycle may range between 70 to 100 minutes and N3 ...


3

Many sleeping pills are addictive. Many non-addictive sleeping pills can be mentally addictive. If you do not mind using sleeping pills for the rest of your life, then that is a perfectly fine choice. Otherwise, you may want to consider other options first. Exercise will help. Use up your energy and your body will WANT sleep. Exercise is key to your body'...


2

You should just stick to the new desired sleep routine and then accept that you'll have a jet lag for a some time. You may not sleep well the first few days, but you should force yourself to get up at the scheduled wake-up time. If you want to set your biological clock 6 hours back, then it may take a week before you're fully adapted to the new routine. ...


2

This is generally unhealthy, especially as sleep cannot be made up or paid back like financial debt. Try to get back to at least seven hours. As always, consult with a doctor. See: National Sleep Foundation’s sleep time duration recommendations.


2

Sleep Hygiene is the first line treatment for most insomnia. This is another good list from Harvard. Anecdotally, the principles of it that worked best for me were blackout curtains, removing everything including TV from the room (the saying is "the bed is just for sleep and sex"), never reading or using my phone in bed, not eating within 3 hrs, and ...


2

A hot topic in hearing research right now is listening effort. The basic idea is that is that individuals with hearing loss need to use additional cognitive resources to process sounds. There is also evidence that mental fatigue impairs physical performance. While I think this evidence provides the basis for arguing that hard of hearing individuals might ...


2

Good question Tehp, You know what I also experienced that, according to Dr. Michael Breus, a Sleep Doctor that a Sleep has its own cycle. The sleep-wake cycle follows a regular pattern (circadian rhythm) and when you sleep “too much” that pattern shifts. Circadian rhythms are the patterns of repeated activity associated with the environmental cycles of day ...


2

I don't know if there is research on this, but if not, this might help. Natural daylight contains a wide range of light frequencies - hence the rainbow, when it's split up. At different times of day, the light has to travel through a different distance in the atmosphere, which tends to absorb some frequencies, and scatter others. This is why the sky ...


2

Melatonin synthesis and secretion (pineal gland) is enhanced by darkness and inhibited by light (photons). DOI: 10.1530/ror.0.0030013 PMID: 9509985


1

According to encyclopedia.com 1 the production of the hormone melatonin (5-methoxy-N-acetyltrypt-amine) varies over the course of a lifetime and over the course of a day. Newborn babies produce very little of this hormone but after the first few months of life the pineal gland increases its production of melatonin. The highest levels occur in children who ...


1

People who sleep less than 6 hours and people who sleep more than 9 hours have been found to have a greater risk of suffering from adverse health effects, see e.g. here. But one cannot conclude from such observed correlations that changing sleeping behavior will help, this requires one to analyze the cause of these correlations. The way long sleep is ...


1

It's best to choose the time period for sleeping such that it doesn't need to be changed often, as this leads to better sleep quality. If this means that you need to sleep during daytime, then you need to make sure your bedroom is very dark and soundproof (or you need to use earplugs). Note also that the official time is based on arbitrary decisions, e.g. ...


1

Yes, something quite similar to what you hypothesize in fact! According to this study (unfortunately, behind a paywall): In short photoperiods, human sleep is biphasic. (Literally the title of the research paper.) When normal individuals were transferred from a conventional 16-h photoperiod to an experimental 10-h photo-period, their sleep episodes ...


1

The way you are sleeping is not necessarily unhealthy, but this is easily debatable and you should probably look at what social and lifestyle factors may be affecting your sleep duration and consider some adjustments. To quote from an article on the "Mystery of Sleep and the Lucky Few Who Don't Need It" Also interesting is how we perceive the amount of ...


1

How deep the sleep is depends on the sleep cycles. This overview from shows, that the deepest sleep stages 3 & 4 only happen during the first half of the night. The second half is mainly REM sleep. However our brain is highly active during al these cycles. Image source: wikipedia Because even at night there are noises and plently of stimulants for the ...


1

I think it would help after the first few times, but lose effectivity as you become used to the less noise. I would think to put your alarm on extra early, and your alarm steadily getting louder would work. If you are in no rush to wake up, then as you get closer to natural wake up time, the alarm would be more likely to rouse you. The headaches probably are ...


1

This answer is more speculative than I like my answers here to be, but I think it still has some value. It is highly unlikely that a single six-day period of working the night shift will have a permanent negative effect. The problem is, this can't really be proven, and that is twofold. First, pretty much all studies on the subject are either done on ...


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