11

First generation H1-antihistamines (such as diphenhydramine = Benadryl) are well known for their sedative effects explaining their limited use in patients with allergic rhinitis. Several pharmacological studies have shown that diphenhydramine crosses the blood brain barrier and produces CNS sedation. Two studies have (partly) addressed your question ...


6

As an insomniac, I've looked into this myself, and found the following to be natural sleep-inducing foods (in no particular order): Cherries -- The tarter, the better. They have melatonin!! And they are great for desert. Chamomile Tea -- apparently it contains the chemical glycine, which helps relax muscles and nerves. Honey -- the natural sugar of honey ...


4

Magnesium, zinc and melatonin help to manage and control the sleep problems. These three natural components have their own mechanisms in managing the sleep disorders. Firstly, talking about Melatonin: Disturbances in the rhythm and amplitude of melatonin secretion may account for symptomatic disturbances to sleep and mood. Melatonin treatment not only ...


3

First, some anecdotal evidence: Whenever I slept in cold environments (cold room, camping), the feet were usually the first that got cold to the point I was not able to sleep. An obvious solution was wearing socks, which usually helped. The opposite is also true. When wearing socks makes me too warm, I may not be able to sleep, so I remove them and it ...


3

Restless Legs Syndrome (a.k.a. Willis-Ekbom Disease) is not rare! What it is is woefully under-diagnosed. Not that you asked, but, although estimates of prevalence vary widely depending on the criteria used, 5-8% of people in Europe/U.S have clinically significant RLS/WED, with women affected about twice as often as men. Now to what you did ask: treatment ...


2

There are very few research data available on the efficacy of hypnosis in the treatment of sleep disorders. Most of the literature is limited to case reports or studies with such a small sample that at times it is very difficult to interpret the results. There is a major placebo effect, so uncontrolled trials are of limited value. http://www....


2

This is generally unhealthy, especially as sleep cannot be made up or paid back like financial debt. Try to get back to at least seven hours. As always, consult with a doctor. See: National Sleep Foundation’s sleep time duration recommendations.


2

Sleep Hygiene is the first line treatment for most insomnia. This is another good list from Harvard. Anecdotally, the principles of it that worked best for me were blackout curtains, removing everything including TV from the room (the saying is "the bed is just for sleep and sex"), never reading or using my phone in bed, not eating within 3 hrs, and ...


1

Schnirman, et al. (2017) talks of such a risk. The mask, which touches the patient’s face, should be cleaned daily with distilled water. Rinsing the face mask or tubing with tap water, instead of using distilled water, or adding tap water in the humidifier is a potential source of legionella colonization. Sterile distilled water cannot sustain legionella ...


1

The way you are sleeping is not necessarily unhealthy, but this is easily debatable and you should probably look at what social and lifestyle factors may be affecting your sleep duration and consider some adjustments. To quote from an article on the "Mystery of Sleep and the Lucky Few Who Don't Need It" Also interesting is how we perceive the amount of ...


1

There is no evidence: "Despite a potential bit of miscommunication about the technique's effect on insomnia, there’s one thing I can be certain about – there doesn’t appear to be any reliable evidence that the 4-7-8 breathing method works."


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