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The typical scenario of a seizure is: loss of consciousness uncontrolled movements recovery The conduct to adopt during each of these phases follows: During 1. and 2. The person will fall on the ground if standing and may get hurt, either due to the fall or due to the uncontrolled movements that will follow. The only things you can (and should) do at ...


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Yes. Most seizures are brief, resolving spontaneously within 1-2 minutes.1 These are rarely fatal. On the other hand, status epilepticus is not infrequently associated with death. Status epilepticus (sometime referred to in shorthand as just status) just means a prolonged seizure lasting at least 30 minutes. It can also refer to a situation that is ...


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It's not really medically accurate, unless there are other drugs of abuse present, or some other disease etiology. The quote that you reference is correct, heroin addiction by itself shouldn't produce seizures as part of withdrawal symptoms. However, there can be other drugs present (Such as alcohol, which can definitely produce seizures during withdrawal) ...


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I have found following peer-reviewed paper which provides a review of the nonpharmaceutic conservative interventions for the prevention of seizures: Wolf P. The role of nonpharmaceutic conservative interventions in the treatment and secondary prevention of epilepsy. Epilepsia. 2002;43 Suppl 9:2-5. 1 It says (I have kept the essential parts): The first ...


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I'll be answering this question in the way @DaveL edited the post. The specialist you should go to is a neurologist. They are the ones who are most qualified when it comes to seizures. In the mean time (because you'll probably have to wait before you can get an appointment), you can go to your GP and explain the problem. The way you're describing it, the ...


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There are several parts in your question. Does pain trigger epileptic seizure? To answer this question, it is essential to understand what is an epilepsy. An epilepsy arises when the normal pattern of neuronal activity is disturbed (ie the epileptogenic threshold is altered). This involves different cellular and molecular alterations: change in neuronal ...


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Treatment of Myoclonus http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3899494/?tool=pmcentrez Caviness JN. Treatment of Myoclonus. Neurotherapeutics. 2014;11(1):188-200. doi:10.1007/s13311-013-0216-3. This article offers a concise and fairly exhaustive approach to the treatment of Myoclonus of any cause. If you look at Figure 3 (the treatment algorithm), ...


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Note: Part of this answer comes from personal experience. Judge as you wish. I have a condition similar to epilepsy, that has caused me to experience a number of seizures over time (ranging from simple partial seizures to full convulsive tonic-clonic seizures, also called "grand mal" seizures). This means that over the past few years, I have taken numerous ...


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"Rachi-" is a prefix associated with the spine, as in Rachischisis. "Amino" is a bit more familiar: it refers to the amino chemical group, or in biomedicine, amino acids. "Aminorachia" seems to be a rarely used term, I see only 3 hits in Google Scholar. One of the sources using the term provides some better context: Selective aminorachia with normal ...


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Here's a brief overview of the types and characteristics of seizures: Epileptic Seizure: Is characterized by "torrents" of electrical discharges by groups of neurons. This temporarily blocks any other neural signals from reaching the CNS. You may lose consciousness, fall stiffly, and have uncontrollable jerking. Epilepsy is not associated with ...


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What are we to say? This is a very delicate issue, and misjudgements from us could lead to severe consequences. Let's assume that the person does in fact suffer from seizures and the SE-Community convinces you of this. Assuming you are from a country with regulations on medicine, there will be nothing you can do, apart from checking Dr. Google to ...


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You would have a history of seizures even if they occured 5 years ago. Histories of disorders go back decades(your lifetime), especially if there is risk of recurrence as in cancer or seizures. Amazon.com Use cautiously in patients with history of seizures, based on reports of seizures due to gingko seed ingestion. Since you need to use it cautiously ...


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