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This is a really interesting question, because it really isn't as easy as people being a bit more susceptible in the winter. There's no definitive answer yet. Influenza Seasonality: Underlying Causes and Modeling Theories says: In temperate climates, flu infections at whatever level of intensity are characterized by a flu season. In these areas, the ...


4

I had a neighbor (who actually farmed Christmas trees) who was allergic to pine pollen. That's not something that you would get from bringing a tree into the house in December though. You can find plenty of information about pine tree pollen allergies - they don't appear to be serious. The American College of Asthma, Allergy, and Immunology points out that ...


3

Nettle-Peppermint Tea: Based on the mechanism of action, it should be noted that plain peppermint or used other ways should help. everyday-roots.com peppermint contains a type of flavonoid called luteolin-7-O-rutinoside which can help inhibit the activity and secretion of anti-inflammatory enzymes, such as histamines, and greatly reduce the dreadful ...


2

Well, since you already have a well-written answer, I just wanted to add this as another possible cause: Research done by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) in 2008 found that the influenza virus has a butter-like coating. The coating melts when it enters the respiratory tract. In the winter, the coating becomes a hardened ...


1

Benadryl (aka diphenhydramine) is strongly anticholinergic1. That means it blocks acetylcholine activity in the body's cells. It does this by binding with the cells' acetylcholine receptors, which just about all cells have. These drugs have been linked to dementia2 in older people. Among the H1-blocking antihistamines (loratadine [Claritin], cetirizine [...


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