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If you must use both to maximally remove infectious organisms from the hands, it's best to wash hands with soap and water, dry, then apply hand sanitizer and allow to air-dry on the skin. This is because dirt, food, oils, etc. on your hands can make the sanitizers less effective. If you first wash your hands to remove barriers to their effectiveness, the ...


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This is something people have been studying since 1847 when Ignaz Semmelweis hypothesized that childbed fever was caused by physicians assisting at deliveries without cleaning their hands (sometimes coming directly from autopsies or cadaver dissections). Since then there have been thousands of experiments performed to find the best methods of hand ...


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"Surely there are more risks" well, you could drown. You could be assaulted or filmed in the change room. You could get dry skin from exposure to the water or the compounds in it - when I swam daily in a semi-public pool I had to use lotion after every swim, which I don't need to do after daily swims in my own these days. But I expect you're more concerned ...


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The safest hand sanitizer from the perspective of reducing antibiotic resistance is the alcohol-based sanitizer. It's effective against a wide variety of microorganisms. Remember, though, that hand sanitizers don't remove dirt and chemicals from your skin, and all of the ingredients in hand sanitizers are left to fully absorb into your skin. Alcohol makes ...


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Much like you probably won't catch a cold every time someone sneezes on you, you also most likely won't get an eye infection every time you neglect contact lens hygiene. We all did it at some point, I'm sure. However... just because you can't see the wildlife on your contacts and hands, doesn't mean it's not there. It is. Little buggers like this one https:/...


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Unless there have been animals around it recently, it's unlikely there are any viruses on it. As for bacteria, or more specifically bacterial spores, wet heat is a far better sanitizer than alcohol. A half hour at a full boil should kill anything particularly nasty, like clostridium tetani. If you want absolute peace of mind this should do the trick, ...


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The video https://youtu.be/sjDuwc9KBps from Jeffrey VanWingen, MD, summarizes methods for safe grocery shopping and cleaning during COVID-19. The main ideas are summarized in https://wgntv.com/news/coronavirus/doctor-shares-useful-tips-for-how-to-properly-clean-your-groceries/: Dr. Jeffrey VanWingen, a physician with Family Medicine Specialists in Grand ...


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Yes, you could possibly become infected through sharing utensils. https://publichealth.arizona.edu/outreach/health-literacy-awareness/hpylori/transmission H. pylori is commonly transmitted person-to-person by saliva. The bacteria can also be spread by fecal contamination of food or water. In developing countries, a combination of untreated water, ...


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I agree with the answers on cleaning and the type of bottle/cork/lid. Another thing you should consider is that residue from your saliva may be what smells bad. Try leaving the freshly-cleaned bottle filled with your usual water out for a day without drinking from it and see if there is any odor, in which case it might be your water source. Then try ...


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Plastic bottles work just fine. When buying sparkling water (I'm German), they come in plastic bottles and never get this taste of old shoe soles, and I haven't had any problems with bacteria either. In your case, the cork could be a problem, as was pointed out before. I personally have made the experience that water in steel bottles always tastes a bit ...


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Yes, to a degree. Since the stuff we touch will be on our hands and the stuff that's on our hands will be on what we touch. CDC: Quickly reduces number of microbes, but not all Less effective in greasy or dirty circumstances So if the handle is greasy or visibly dirty the amount of microbes that are killed are decreased. It may be better to just grab ...


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