6

Well, there is one meta-analytical estimate of the IFR for Covid-19 out already albeint only as a draft paper: there were 13 estimates of IFR included in the final meta-analysis, from a wide range of countries, published between February and April 2020. The meta-analysis demonstrated a point-estimate of IFR of 0.75% (0.49-1.01%) with significant ...


5

The paradox you describe is resolved if you think about the influenza vaccine that is approved as a procedure for making an annual vaccine. It is the procedure, repeated year-after-year, that has been tested safe and effective against the strains included in the vaccine that year. The vaccine is produced in the same way each year, and all the manufacturing ...


3

I'll point out some possible situations; these are certainly not exhaustive and some can overlap, but will probably give you a better idea. Some of the terminology I'll use might be a bit US-centric, but the general principles also apply elsewhere. Phase 1 clinical trials Phase 1 trials are the first of four phases that make up a typical clinical trial ...


3

You would want to talk to the staff who are recruiting patients; I'm not aware of any such trials that have started anywhere yet. I would expect you would have access to most of those things depending on what your definitions are of private time and physical activity. As far as asking questions, just be direct and define your terms. "Can I bring my computer ...


3

The vaccine isn't defying the 12-18 month estimate, assorted company PR departments are defying the 12-18 month estimate. It's unlikely that an actual vaccine will become available in the timeframe these people are promising.


2

Modelling has certainly been done but they operate under assumptions that may not be true. For example the one done for Singapore: Findings For the baseline scenario, when R0 was 1·5, the median cumulative number of infections at day 80 was 279 000 (IQR 245 000–320 000), corresponding to 7·4% (IQR 6·5–8·5) of the resident population of Singapore. The ...


2

Under the assumption that infected people become permanently immune and stop transmitting the disease, the virus will eventually just run out of people to infect. Currently the "R" value, which measures the average number of people that an infected person contaminates, is somewhere around 2.5 if people behave normally. R below 1 means there will be less and ...


2

Below is a summary of all data and findings answering this question meeting the above criteria which I have found or which have been pointed out in answers to this question. The mortality risk given is that provided in the research paper cited, or, where no paper is cited (sources 6,7 and 9), the number of deaths divided by number of infections based on the ...


2

Around 1 to 2%. While @Fizz and @Dale Newton have already provided a nice collection (with statistics even), I'd like to add one more, which is based on common sense as well as statistics. First off, the source should be such that it could reasonably be expected to report truthful data; that pretty much means democratic governments which are taking this ...


2

No, this is incorrect. It assumes a uniform distribution of values within the reference range, which is rarely the case. There is not enough data here to say which percentile you are in. For that, you need to know the actual distribution. This requires more research.


2

The US' National Institute of Health maintains the Daily Med database, which is searchable by active and inactive ingredients.


1

The article you linked has the following citation in APA format when clicking "cite". Goldman, A. S., Chheda, S., Keeney, S. E., Schmalstieg, F. C., & Schanler, R. J. (1994). Immunologic protection of the premature newborn by human milk. Seminars in perinatology, 18(6), 495–501. Google searching for the journal Seminars in perinatology comes ...


1

I think this question is too vague for a definite answer, but areas to consider would include: confounding vs effect modifier: where do smoking and condition A lie in relation to the outcome of mortality? matched pairs study: if it is ethical, you could get a simple random sample consisting of people with condition A that do not smoke and pair each ...


1

The entire point of having a placebo control from a statistics perspective is that the only thing different between the groups is the treatment. You cannot say this is true if you also tell people which group they are in: if you do this, there are now two differences between groups, 1) Treatment vs placebo, 2) Knowing they are in the placebo group vs. ...


1

The paper is here https://www.scribd.com/document/456897616/DHSST#fullscreen&from_embed It doesn't say but I presume that the Department of Homeland Security knows what sunlight is.


1

3Blue1Brown made a great video (Simulating an Epidemic) showcasing the effects of tweaking various parameters on outbreaks using simulations. Background: His simulation is based on the SIR model, which categorizes a population into people Susceptible to the disease, people Infected with the disease, and people Recovered from the disease. For every unit of ...


1

It is a known fact that STDs are more easily transmitted by unprotected anal intercourse. As some STDs are known to (rarely) cause endocarditis, it seems plausible to me that unprotected anal intercourse increases the risk of an endocarditis. I could, however, find no statistical analysis on the relationship between (receptive) anal intercourses and ...


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