Hot answers tagged

11

Background Most kidney stones (~80%) are calcium stones, and the majority of those are primarily composed of calcium oxalate. Oxalate (C2O42−) is a dianion that combines with divalent cations such as magnesium and calcium. The magnesium salt is much more soluble than the calcium salt. Because these cations compete for binding to oxalate, both lower ...


4

I am not a health professional, but I did some research on exactly your question because my friend, who is quite young, has calcium oxalate kidney stones. Most of my citations are not directly from academic journals, but from websites of well known medical centers (see below). Few things that I learned (in addition to Susan's answer): -drinking enough ...


2

The Impact Of Long-Term Lithium Treatment On Renal Function In An Outpatient Population Lithium is known to affect renal concentrating ability, and lithium-induced polyuria is not uncommon, estimated to affect approximately 20% of patients, but this is rarely clinically significant. It is less clear, however, whether or not the protracted use of ...


1

I don't belive it is possible for the body to produce too much ADH. The body will likely produce insufficient ADH to eliminate the ingested water, thus you will still remain in a state of hyponatremia even after the body's ADH response. The body will then return to homeostatus by reducing thirst. This means of course that if you ingest too much water (...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible