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This is a broad question, but here are just a few major things to take into consideration after a surgical procedure. Early mobility has been shown for many years to be a major predictor of postoperative outcome, even in something like a hip fracture, where you would think rest was mandatory. The rapidity with which one returns to preoperative levels of ...


6

If you’re young and healthy with only mild symptoms, your doctor will likely advise you to isolate yourself at home and to limit contact with others in your household. You’ll likely be advised to rest, stay well hydrated, and to closely monitor your symptoms. This means that if you have mild symptoms, yes, you will eventually "cure" yourself, the same way ...


4

Quarantine (self or imposed) does help prevent the spread of infectious diseases. This is sufficient to recommend convalescence at home, but there is no good evidence for a shorter recovery period for those who stay at home. The idea that resting at home helps conserve energy and recover from illness is pervasive and seems sensible, but has little data ...


4

This must depend on the local situation. At the beginning of the pandemic Japanese Hospitals were admitting PCR positive asymptomatic patients. Then as the disease spread Chinese authorities in Hubei were creating field hospitals (sixteen Fang Cang hospitals in Wuhan ) to house the less symptomatic patients and leaving the hospitals with ICU facilities to ...


3

The current recommendations of the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) depend on whether testing is available and has been done. They offer two criteria, the first is non-test-based and the second is test-based. For persons who have not been tested, the recommended criteria are: Persons with COVID-19 who have symptoms and were directed to care for ...


3

I am certainly no expert, however I had a hip replacement in August 2015 and I know I have a slight leg length difference now. It's very common in hip surgery but I think we are so pleased to be out of pain it doesn't seem important until we are fully recovered as you are and then possibly left with a limp. I was measured about 8 weeks after surgery and ...


3

I have accepted an answer, but want to add one of my own with some more details I have observed as I go through the process (it's Day 5 today.) First, this is something you can do to help yourself feel better. Compared to lying in bed, in pain, bored, possibly lonely and scared, and not sure what happens next, just waiting to get better. Giving you ...


2

According to this case report, Testing should be considered if the patient is not meeting goals of rehabilitation, because altered taste perception may lead to depression, weight loss, and malnutrition, all of which may act to confound rehabilitation efforts. I could not find research about directly re-stimulating the taste buds, but at the very ...


2

There may be multiple reasons why your doctor advised you to move around after a surgery. One common theme that most surgeons follow is to avoid deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Post surgery, if the patients are bed ridden for too long, blood tends to accumulate in their calf muscle where there is a secondary blood pump that is active only if ...


2

There is a study that the amount of sleep is associated with the probability of getting infected by the common cold. The researchers attribute the finding to the impaired functioning of the immune system, when sleeping less. This may not answer your question directly, but it is related. Logistic regression analysis revealed that actigraphy-assessed ...


2

The best theoretical model we have is that the SARS and SARS-CoV-2 viruses knock out the ACE2 receptor found on numerous tissues including alveolar cells, and myocytes, and intestinal luminal cells. If those cells have died then they need to be replaced, and if and until when that happens there will be reduced organ function. CT scans of recovered patients ...


1

TL;DR: Yes, but it's extremely rare and I could only find one example. You asked: Has there ever been a medically verified case of someone having a big part of their body paralyzed for years, due to a car accident or similar event, who eventually recovered the normal functioning of their paralyzed body part? It's very rare but I did find one example: The ...


1

This video by Kurzgesagt gives a good overview of how the COVID-19 infection process works. The damage it causes to the lungs seems to the result of it damaging the cells that create a protective lining of your lungs; this happens both directly as a result of their infections of these cells, as well as by causing the immune system to attack healthy cells. By ...


1

Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician: Using the Evidence According to this link 6 to 12 months healing are for a nipple piercing, but some can take as long as 18 months. Definitely avoid it. Chlorine and the bacteria in unchlorinated waters may both irritate your newly pierced ears. It is therefore recommended that you wait 2-3 weeks after ...


1

Though most people do get surgery to reconstruct their torn ACL, it is possible to regain full ability of your knee without surgery. Just through rehabilitation, you can totally recover from a torn ACL. In a clinical trial done in 2010,1 two different treatment strategies were given to 121 young, active adults (ages 18-35) who suffered acute ACL injuries. ...


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