6

There are thousands of papers that study medication errors. They fall into various groups. There is the provider side, the pharmacist side, the technician side, the nursing side, and the system side (just for a start). Papers tend to look at one area, say pharmacy, and not the provider. Or they look at nursing, but not pharmacy or provider. Some papers ...


6

Educate yourself! That means reading up. From reliable sources. Most of the information on the internet is mere statements on sites that present health relevant info as easy and simple. But in reality most often answers to your question are not so easy and not so simple. While certain companies and sometimes even mother nature might not subscribe to the ...


6

At this point in time no one can say for sure why many people appear to have asymptomatic infection, and figures range from 20-80% though part of the problem appears to be from false positives in antibody tests. Nevertheless there have been large numbers picked up on rt-PCR who carry the virus but at the time do not show symptoms. Some, if not most, go on ...


5

The danger posed to society from this disease doesn't come from the mortality rate, rather from the potential to make large fraction of the population ill. Unlike the flu virus, this virus is a new virus to which we have no immunity. About 10% of the infected people requires hospital treatment, which is a lot higher than in case of flu. The death rate of ...


5

Update Apr 2: Pooled tests are under development now (newspaper in German), the plan is to pool 5 samples and to use the usual amount of each sample (and presumably dilute less) so that sensitivity is not an issue. Update Apr 9 NYT article mentioning a pooled procedure for routine tests for health care workers (pooling 10 samples) in Germany. In general, ...


5

The reason why many people who contract COVID-19 are asymptomatic is simple. It is because your immune system can kill the pathogen before you show symptoms. In other words, your body overwhelms the virus before it takes over larger areas of your body. The answer to your second and third question is yes and no. Most people, that recover quickly without ...


4

There are some data about possible causes of vaping-related lung damage, the type of the damage and symptoms, but not about the changes in medical history questionnaires, vaping habits or e-cigarette firmware. Most commonly associated substances were THC and nicotine containing oils. Most of the investigated samples contained very high amounts of vitamin E. ...


4

It depends on the diet and the person. However, protein myths abound because people look at extreme ends of the scale, and assume that outlier needs are suitable for the masses. If you are looking for homeostasis and general maintenance, then the upper limit that has been shown in studies to be beneficial is 1.6g/kg/d, or about .73g/lb/day. 1g/lb/day is a ...


3

The principal goal of pooled testing is to rapidly clear many cases in low prevalence (or incidence) situations. Long version: Disclaimer: I'm analytical chemist, i.e. someone who could by profession be involved in developing such tests, but I'm not involved in SARS-CoV2 testing or SARS-CoV2 test development. What I write here is basically my general ...


3

When you say slow down the rate of transmission indoors, most countries that I know of with this condition are in lock-down or practicising social distancing to reduce the risk of spread. So, I presume that you must mean the spread of disease from an infected person to another in the same household. We have some data to suggest that virus viability is ...


3

The USA Today article you linked to provides two potential explanations: The FDA said the spike is because of improvements made to its reporting system over the last two years. Pharmacy industry experts believe the numbers also reflect more people are filling more prescriptions than ever. The first explanation seems quite plausible, as it's unlikely that ...


3

That is on the one hand quite a broad question ("these countries") for not a very vague but a very specific number. On the other hand this is indeed a public health issue very much unfocused by the public eye. One additional problem not mentioned in the question is that from all the donated equipment some is not suitable, beyond repair, unwanted, without ...


2

While it could still be a mixture of acute reasons: metals, dust, plainly unknown toxins; the underlying reason seems not to be that plant matter is vaped, nor that liquids are vaped. It also seems not to be causal whether THC or nicotine are in most cases "associated" with the disease. What the fast onset of this disease makes prudent: implicating either ...


2

Not knowing what diets you have used, or what your current diet restrictions are, its impossible to suggest a specific food. It also sounds like you are interested in self observation of results. Knowing this, you might find an excel chart I'm working on to be helpful (StapleFoodsNutrition.xlsx). It's a work in progress, but the goal is to find a basic ...


2

To Mask or not To Mask that is the question One thing China did early on was wearing face masks to protect others. They are still doing it today even though there has been no deaths for 10 days and most new cases (counted in dozens and not 10s of thousands like USA today) are imported rather than community spread. This picture from a couple days ago: Source:...


2

There are several use cases. But the main reason is always to operate in a situation where the number of tests is a bottleneck or constraint. In the USA, this is usually because of limited test reagents or limited laboratory techs and machines to run the PCR. If you have unlimited testing, you would not use pooled testing. One use case is surveillance. You ...


1

In three recent past outbreaks involving a new virus (or an old virus spreading)—the Ebola outbreaks in West Africa and the Congo, the Zika outbreak in South America, and the 2009 H1N1 (swine flu) influenza pandemic-- the WHO or its subsidiaries (PAHO) have played a prominent role in tracking the outbreak and making regular reports about disease spread ...


1

From your link, The Atlantic has its data tracking project at https://covidtracking.com/data If you go there you can drill down by state, the number of cumulative positive and negative results. They show the number of new daily tests and so you can extract the data you want from there about the positivity rates So, the cumulative data for Alabama


1

Recent studies have reported that about 80% of people infected with SARS-CoV2 are asymptomatic, it means they are "silent carriers". These patients show no or very mild symptoms. As it is known that viruses need to get into living cells to divide and survive. Same applies with SARS-CoV2, this virus attaches its spike protein present on the outer shell with ...


1

As of May 2020, many governmental timelines are being developed as the result of COVID-19 forecasting models from public health authorities, although others may be politically or economically influenced as well. While the IHME models have been featured, others including the Northeastern University models developed by Prof Alessandro Vespignani have been ...


1

There actually numerous documents discussing the matter but one moderately cited paper (~300 citations) Hatchett et al. (2007) compared the responses on US cities during the 1918 influenza: Nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) intended to reduce infectious contacts between persons form an integral part of plans to mitigate the impact of the next ...


1

Israel now have the capacity to pool 64 tests in one “According to the new pooling approach that we have currently tested, molecular testing can be performed on a “combined sample,” taken from 32 or 64 patients. This way we can significantly accelerate the testing rate. Only in those rare cases, where the joint sample is found to be positive, will we ...


1

If we compare Covid19 to SARS or MERS - COVID19 seems to have a R0 slightly higher than SARS but lower than MERS. From various sources it appears that COVID-19 could be between 2 and 7, so compariable to diseases such as mumps and diphtheria in spread. Infection fatality rates vary wildly right now as the sample size is very small, but from 0.2% up to 18% (...


1

If based on WHO situation reports, an estimate of 10% for the case fatality rate for pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 lasted about five to six days, not weeks and not months. This does not mean that a 10% case fatality rate was erased from press reports or from public perception about the virus even after WHO reported substantially lower case fatality rates. ...


1

Short answer yes, unless you have got any condition stopping you from doing so. Now the long answer: Protein is the building block of the body. If we consider the human body as a huge network of interconnected chemical reactions, we can appreciate it a little better. Mostof chemical reactions in the body use enzymes as catalyst and most enzymes are proteins. ...


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