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YES, according to: The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) of the United States and National Heath Service (NHS) of the United Kingdom. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is a clinically approved method to treat depression, without the usage of medication. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a common and well-studied form of psychotherapy, ...


6

As going through your question, you show your inner feelings. So it is better you to go with "Psychologist". Psychiatrist is a medical doctor, he or she has the knowledge and training to evaluate underlying medical problems or drug effects that could cause emotional or behavioral symptoms. Whereas Psychologist deals with mental health. Psychologists ...


5

Permanent loss of memory seems only occur in the memory of the treatment and events leading up to the treatment. The results indicated that ECT can initially disrupt recall of events that occurred many years previously, but recovery of these memories was virtually complete by seven months after treatment. It was also clear that persisting memory loss for ...


4

Drugs.com mentions that prolonged use of Lugol's solution (potassium iodide + iodine) can cause confusion, caused by potassium. In long-term treatment of Grave's disease (overactive thyroid), 10–400 mg iodide per day has been used (PubMed, 2107). Various drug websites do not mention psychosis, aggressiveness, illusions or irritability as a side effect of ...


3

I came across a similar question in Psychology.SE whilst researching CBT for a course I was studying. The short answer As I will cover in the long answer, there has been a lot of articles stating that CBT is very effective, and there are articles which have stated that it is not as effective as has been claimed. CBT is not a single model of therapy, ...


2

Yes. This is an interesting question. I can think of two examples, one which I think is closer to what you're thinking about, and another being related conceptually. 1. Prodromal phase of schizophrenia then surely it should reason that there are people who experience delusions that are the opposite of distress i.e pleasure What you're describing, if ...


2

Thoughts about wanting to die or killing oneself do constitute suicidal ideation. Ideation is defined as the process of forming ideas or images. So that applied to suicide or wanting to die = suicidal ideation. That said, it doesn't mean that the individual is at immediate risk of completing suicide. Depression is common; 1/3 of human beings alive ...


2

National Alliance for Mental Illness - NAMI (Main Line, PA) quotes an article from SAMHSA: Therapy is a collaborative process, so finding the right match-someone with whom you have a sense of rapport-is critical. After you find someone, keep in mind that therapy is work and sometimes can be painful. However, it also can be rewarding and life changing. In ...


2

According to DSM-5 (American Psychiatric Association, 2013, p. 819) a delusion is a "false belief based on incorrect inference about external reality that is firmly held despite what almost everyone else believes and despite what constitutes incontrovertible and obvious proof or evidence to the contrary. ... When a false belief involves a value judgement it ...


2

The authors did an experiment with two independent variables: group and region. The groups are "schizophrenia" and "no schizophrenia" (controls). The a priori regions were the frontal cortex, anterior cingulate, and hippocampus (they also had exploratory analyses of other regions). Their study was a PET scan, measuring [11C]UCB-J as a marker for synaptic ...


2

Also provided at the Medscape webpage linked by @GrahamChiu, Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been demonstrated by the American Psychiatric Association to be an effective and safe treatment for many psychiatric disorders. (Jaffe, 2001) The use of ECT still generates significant controversy, however. One review concluded that ECT is only marginally more ...


2

Approximately 100,000 patients annually receive ECT in the United States. and In the United States, ECT is most commonly performed 3 times per week regardless of electrode placement. [1] More frequent regimens are not justified. [1] Treatments 2 times per week may result in less memory impairment than treatments 3 times per week. [1, 9] Compared with ...


1

I generated some arbitrary data that might be a little similar to theirs (though I've only included x-values up to 4) to show how this might happen: R code to do this: library(tidyverse) N <- 10 a <- data.frame(x=0,y=rnorm(N,mean=log(1),sd=.5)) b <- data.frame(x=1,y=rnorm(N,mean=log(1.07),sd=.5)) c <- data.frame(x=2,y=rnorm(N,mean=log(1.29),sd=...


1

Are there studies on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)? Of course, and the studies are numerous. If conducted in non-Chinese contexts the results are most of the time quite underwhelming or more reason for concern than anything like "encouraging". Way too often the theory behind the treatments appears flaky, the evidence for effectiveness regarding desired ...


1

To answer your question you need to break the psychology terms up into their components. First of all let's look at Psychosis. Psychosis certainly isn't a loss of contact from impaired thoughts and emotions Psychosis is the presence of delusions, hallucinations without insight, or both. (Arciniegas, 2015) or more simply put... an abnormal ...


1

Since Bipolar disorder is a medical condition you and your brother should find a psychiatrist who can manage your pathology optimally. Even if you trust in this audio-psycho-phonology it is not supported by any scientific evidence so I would advice against using it. Medical therapy (lithium etc) is essential and could be eventually supported by ...


1

It's probably difficult but possible to quit. Here's a case report of a guy who was severely addicted. He spent up to 8 hours a day online, watching pornography, and lost several jobs due to addiction. He needed help from a psychiatrist, but did manage to get sexually sober. If he quit, you can too. :) An Internet filter might help. Pluckeye is good. Or you ...


1

Call your psychologist and ask for such option if you can get the e-mail, because you would like to explain your situation in writing. If they don't have, you can explain your situation on the paper either handwriting or on the computer and print it before going to the appointment. Especially when it's a private psychologist, they'll love to read what you'...


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