6

If the weapon is still in the wound : don't touch anything and call the appropriate emergency system (varies from country to country). Never attempt to remove any penetrating object still in situ as this may cause more serious bleeding If the wound is open, apply little pressure on it with clean clothes. And call the appropriate emergency system, keep ...


5

So this was an interesting one for me, because I never seriously tried to consider it. Most online sources that claim this say it's an "old army trick," but after reading several perspectives on wound care in the military, I don't know that is true. The actual historical roots on this idea I could find actually go back to reference a slave owner using it ...


4

A triangular wound can possibly be sutured, depending on many considerations regarding the wound including its type, condition, location, size, shape, depth, cleanliness vs presence of debris, mechanism of injury, the force of the injury, the age of the wound, tension on the wound, the patient’s medical history, species if the wound is a bite, etc... In “...


4

Triangular blades were created for pretty much one reason, and one reason only. The triangular cross section made a stronger blade, ensuring more damage was done in a charge/stab versus a flat blade. The triangular blade was introduced in the early 1700's, mostly due to strength reasons. A triangular blade is less likely to bend/break when stabbing in a ...


3

No! With brain injuries, it is not recommended anymore to keep patients awake because people with a concussion need to sleep to recover. In the days before head CT scanning was widely available, the only way to know if someone had life-threatening brain bleeding (which occurs in less than 0.1 percent of those with concussion) was to observe him for a ...


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