7

Yes (ish), this meta-analysis proved a strong correlation between exposure to pesticides and likelihood of developing Parkinson's. Note, there is no direct X level of exposure leads to Y likelihood, just a strong correlation. "Although the risk of PD increased with increased duration of exposure to pesticides, no significant dose-response relation was ...


6

Yes. Gene therapy is an active area of research; most gene therapy approaches that are studied use some sort of viral vector, those that don't are more the exception and it is unclear how several of those methods would be applied clinically. There have already been clinical trials of gene therapy with viral vectors, with mixed success. Edelstein, M. L., ...


4

Neurodegenerative diseases are diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms (memory impairment for Alzheimer Disease/ bradykinesia, tremor and rigor for Parkinson Disease) +/- neuropsychological tests. The current role of neuroimaging in the diagnosis of neurogenerative diseases such as Parkinson Disease or Alzheimer Disease is mainly supportive, it can be ...


3

Parkinson's is a progressive disease 1, so in general it's going to progress through all the stages eventually for most patients, but there are very few things in medicine you can say "always" happen (except maybe that exceptions always happen). Although Parkinson’s disease (PD) is progressive and worsens over time, it is highly individual and affects ...


1

Not directly about pesticides but I have years ago read that Parkinson's is post-Industrial Revolution disease -- that is, it started to be observed once coal started to be used in large quantities for powering industrial furnaces and engines. One could argue that the increase in life span that occurred at around the same time might be responsible for cases ...


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