15

The OP observes: When I was a smoker, my own SpO2 was usually 100%. Although long-term smoking often does lead to changes in the lungs that cause hypoxemia (low peripheral O2 Saturation, a.k.a. SpO2), these effects are not immediate. In fact, in the short term, SpO2 may even be spuriously high, consistent with your observation. We should distinguish ...


11

This a vast topic, and sorry for the superficial nature of my answer. Iron is an essential component of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is a coloured pigment which binds to oxygen and carries it across the body. It binds to oxygen at a place where there is high oxygen tension (for example, lungs) and release it at a place where there is low oxygen tension (such as ...


9

Hyperventilation can lead to reduced oxygen transport to cells. As a result, ineffective breathing patterns can cause cell and tissue hypoxia, chronic inflammation, immunosuppression, and many other negative effects caused by low body-oxygen levels and hypocapnia (reduced CO2 levels). Hypoxia has been found to be a driving force in several health ...


8

The basic idea is that people with pulmonary diseases that involve chronic hypoventilation rely on mild hypoxia to stimulate respiration. To understand this, consider a basic homeostatic feedback loop that controls respiratory drive. During a breath hold, carbon dioxide levels rise and oxygen levels fall. Carbon dioxide diffuses across the blood-brain ...


7

Ah, but they can and do. A non-rebreather (NRB) mask with 100% O2 flowing at 12-15 L/min will provide about 90% O2 concentration to an adult. This is true even for the largest adult in severe respiratory distress. There are a couple of reasons for this. First, the 3 liters figure you cited is the inspiratory reserve volume (IRV). Here are two definitions ...


6

Apart from monks and nuns who showcase impressive abilities Wim Hof is onto something. One anecdote reads as follows: I’ve also experienced the positive changes myself, […] My cardiovascular and muscular endurance has increased substantially too, with a reduction in my run times, thanks to the over-saturation of oxygen to my cells, activation of my ...


5

Yes, SpO2 levels can be depressed in smokers, but the body will compensate for some of the effects which can explain why you may have had normal saturation levels. There are also age considerations, as well as how much a person smokes. One of the culprits in cigarette smoke is CO, or Carbon Monoxide. CO shares the same binding sites as O2 in blood ...


5

Does carbon monoxide poisoning make you tired before it kills you? The symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning can vary per person it affects, and it can also depend on the the levels of exposure to each person. The short answer would be yes, general fatigue and tiredness can be a symptom of carbon monoxide poisoning. I believe this is accurate for one ...


3

In addition to circumstances where an oxygen source would itself be a hazard for external reasons, and in those with chronic type 2 respiratory failure as pointed out in Graham Chie's answer; there is a move away from providing supplementary O2 in those with myocardial infarction (in line with AVOID, which assessed both pre- and in-hospital supplementation, ...


3

Clearly if there's a risk of fire, then giving oxygen outside the hospital risks fire. And in neonates, high flow oxygen can cause oxygen toxicity. If there is no such risk, then the main objection is that by removing the hypoxic respiratory drive in patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure the patient then stops breathing. The risks of oxygen therapy ...


2

Let's first clarify that "vasomotor rhinitis (VMR) otherwise known as non-allergic rhinitis" is the non-allergic reaction (NAR), which can be similar in symptoms to the allergic reaction (AR), but not the same. Vasomotor rhinitis is a poorly understood disorder which mimics many of the symptoms of nasal allergy, but has a completely different basis. ...


1

Reduced oxygen saturation in blood is called hypoxia (though strictly that means reduced oxygen in the tissues). If there is marked reduction in oxygen saturation of blood, it may lead to bluish discoloration of skin and tongue, called cyanosis. Mildly reduced arterial oxygen saturation may be due to mild respiratory or cardiac diseases. A common lung ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible