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The Chromosomes are not the main Factor in this. The immune system (and antibodies) is, this is a bit different. For example females have a higher HLA antigens and therefore rely on more immunsuppressive therapy. This Therapy is the thing that makes a transplantation possible, nearly all Organs are incompatible to the body, that means that you always have to ...


6

@NilsPawlik has addressed the issue of a donor/recipient gender mismatch (it's not the most important factor, but it is something to consider). I thought I'd clarify the point about donor/recipient compatibility. What makes an organ compatible? There are a number different things that make a donor organ work more or less well for a recipient, but each ...


3

Whilst the Science Museum of London points out that we seem to be close to developing complete human organs, there appears to be a few more years before we are able to grow the first complete usable organ. For example, Lytal (2018) points out that so far, scientists haven’t been able to create complete adult human kidneys because they’re too complex, but ...


2

Liver donation - an act of great honor - should only be done once. Liver regeneration occurs via compensatory hyperplasia. Regeneration of the liver can be more correctly defined as compensatory hyperplasia where in the remaining liver tissue expands to meet the metabolic needs of the organism. Unlike anatomic true regeneration, the expanding liver does not ...


2

"for someone else, of course" Of course not. You haven't read or understood the rules. The point is that you donate a kidney and then the intended recipient gets a voucher to redeem your kidney in the future. The vouchers are not transferrable and only exist to enable someone to donate a kidney for someone else at a time that suits them but not have the ...


2

Not really, not in any long term way. The purpose of bone marrow is (Most often) to provide clean slates (The scientific term being "stem cells") for the production of platelets (Helps with blood clotting), red blood cells (Transports oxygen and carbon dioxide to tissues), and white blood cells (Fights infection). Usually only two to three percent of bone ...


1

To get the answers started, though admittedly with a very rough estimation, I'll add my own idea of a lower bound of calories burned to regrow an entire liver. Because basic laws of thermodynamics state that to produce 100 calories worth of food requires at the very least 100 calories worth of energy, an estimate on the nutritional content of the liver ...


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