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Is it right and safe to prescribe this combination (NSAID like diclofenac + baby Aspirin) specially with the knowledge that this combination gonna be used for a long time? While NSAID are associated with many side effects (alteration in renal function, hypertension, hepatic function and platelet function), the most deleterious effects of aspirin and ...


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The main risk of Tylenol (aka acetaminophen/paracetamol) is liver damage, as this article from the FDA advises: This drug is generally considered safe when used according to the directions on its labeling. But taking more than the recommended amount can cause liver damage, ranging from abnormalities in liver function blood tests, to acute liver failure, ...


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Injury or infection triggers the release of prostaglandins, which can cause pain, fever and inflammation (all of which are direct effects of prostaglandins). Painkillers and Prostaglandins (Nature): Prostaglandins are powerful signaling agents in the human body. The two-dozen or so members of this family of small lipid messengers underpin many ...


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Aspirin, just like all NDSAIDs, affects enzymes associated with pain transmission; they are COX-1 and COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-1 and 2). COX-1 helps protect the stomach and intestinal lining from the acids the stomach produces 1. Since NSAIDs inhibit the production of these enzymes, they also leave your stomach and intestinal lining somewhat unprotected from ...


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There is convincing evidence that measures, like crushing the tablets before use, taking them with food or water, lower doses and temporary discontinuation of use, are associated with the lower risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. DISCLAIMER: This information is not intended to interfere with any drug regime prescribed by a doctor. How NSAIDs cause ...


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Aspirin is a platelet inhibitor. As such it has a number of bleeding risks - including GI bleeding as described above. Risks also include increased bleeding risk from injury including cuts, bruising, or hitting your head and having a brain bleed. And actually, even without head trauma, an intracranial hemorrhage risk increases with the dose of aspirin. The ...


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Naproxen has a half-life of between twelve and seventeen hours.1 Constant steady-state serum levels of Naproxen are produced after four to five days..1 It stands to reason that the lower the dose the lower the renal and hepatic load and vice versa; the higher dosage requires the kidneys and liver to remove more of the drug. @D Bagnall is correct, however, ...


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Yes, it is safe. The mechanism that ibuprofen and paracetamol use are different and don't interact negatively. In fact, the two drugs (medicines) can be used in conjunction for a synergistic effect so that it will provide greater pain relief than either drug alone. With that said, still follow the standard dosing instructions for each drug. That means don't ...


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Commonly prescribed dose of aspirin for certain types of arthritis can be as high as 4 g/day (Drugs.com). For angina pectoris and heart attack prevention, even low doses (75-325 mg/day) can result in gastrointestinal bleeding (PubMed). According to one study (PubMed): Mini-dose aspirin...(75 mg/day), caused significant changes in renal function and ...


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How do painkillers work? When part of your body is injured, special nerve endings send pain messages back to your brain. Painkilling drugs interfere with these messages, either at the site of the injury, in the spinal cord or in the brain itself. Many painkillers are based on one of two naturally occurring drugs: aspirin and opiates. Aspirin uses a ...


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Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the kidneys You’re right that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have an effect on the glomerular arterioles by inhibiting prostaglandin production. This is why they can be renotoxic; if the affereny arteriole constricts, the filtration pressure drops and this can lead to renal failure in susceptible ...


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The way in that this question is framed looks like a false dichotomy. The very first sentence of a recent book starts with: NSAIDs are one of the most widely prescribed drugs around the world to treat pain and inflammation. In treatment we often do want the inflammation to go down if it's overshooting. In treatment we often do want the pain to go down if ...


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Corticosteroids block the enzyme Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) which catalyses the first step in arachidonic acid synthesis pathway. But, NSAIDs blocks activity of cyclooxygenases (COX 1 and COX 2). So, by blocking this pathway at first step completely prevents the formation of of Arachidonic acid, but when this pathway is blocked later at step performed by COX ...


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Speaking from my humble experience, when prescribing NSAIDs (especially long-term, e.g. Aspirin as thrombosis prophylaxis) it is standard to combine those with PPIs (Proton Pump Inhibitors) as preventive medication against NSAID-associated GI-events. Clinical trials of this therapy generally show positive outcomes (you can find different articles on this ...


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Simply, Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) produce their therapeutic activities (Pain and Inflammation relief) through inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX), the enzyme that makes prostaglandins (PGs).


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1. NSAIDs can increase the chance of heart attack or stroke. This risk may be greater if you have heart disease or risk factors (for example, smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes) for heart disease. However, the risk may also be increased in people who do not have heart disease or those risk factors. Heart problems caused by NSAIDs can ...


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I am really happy that I found Krill oil. It's an omega 3,6,9 oil made from krill. (a sea creature similar to shrimp but much smaller). It makes this choice the strongest choice in benefits of any fish oil, but no yucky taste if you burp. I can't take NSAIDS anymore, but I found that after a few days of taking krill oil, it works as an anti-inflammatory pain ...


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