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If you have sensorineural hearing loss and regularly use headphones, you might be listening to a louder volume than if you did not have hearing loss. This may mean you could be subjecting your hearing apparatus to potentially damaging thresholds. Hearing aids are not just fancy headphones. They are sophisticated aural rehabilitation devices that are tuned ...


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I cover the answer to the vast majority of this question in this answer. Basically, there are standards regarding the total sound exposure that is safe, but the evidence base for these standards is limited. This a a nice online calculator for calculating the noise dose. The unique part of your question relates to the difference between audiobooks and music. ...


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Asking for earphones/headphones which have a good sound quality is not on-topic for this group as this generates opinion related answers at best. Some people's idea of good quality can be very different to others. To highlight this I wonder where you get the idea that sound quality is poor when there are no sound specifications provided on the website. If ...


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Using noise isolating headphones poses no additional risks beyond regular headphones. Using high quality headphones poses no additional risks beyond wearing hearing aids, and in fact the materials are often the same. The risk of prolonged listening is overall exposure. There are a who bunch of standards for calculating the overall noise exposure dose. This a ...


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There are a number of issues wrapped up in this question. The first, which deteriorates faster treble or bass, is that Presbycusis, age related hearing loss, is a high frequency (i.e., treble) phenomenon. While hearing loss can occur due to damage of the tympanic membrane (i.e., ear drum), this is a conductive hearing loss that can be generally be well ...


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