Skip to main content
9 votes

Why can't surgeons operate on nerves?

Well, you can do do various surgical procedures on nerves. You can suture a macroscopic nerve (i.e. a nerve that you can see) that has been injured. However, there are various problems that come with ...
Sæmundur Rögnvaldsson's user avatar
8 votes

What is the name for the symptom of mishearing words?

Receptive aphasia is a type of aphasia in which patients have difficulty understanding ("receiving") words as opposed to difficulty speaking them. There are more than one possible etiology and it is ...
DoctorWhom's user avatar
  • 5,814
7 votes
Accepted

Why do I feel small stings all over my body in stress?

Paresthesia Anxiety Symptoms -- seems like the term/condition you are looking for (though I am not a doctor and am not diagnosing you as such -- I'm just trying to inform you of the term you might be ...
Butterfly and Bones's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Parkinson's Disease and Pesticides

Yes (ish), this meta-analysis proved a strong correlation between exposure to pesticides and likelihood of developing Parkinson's. Note, there is no direct X level of exposure leads to Y likelihood, ...
John's user avatar
  • 1,104
6 votes
Accepted

Myelin regeneration in Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (Children)

Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an inflammatory disorder, which often follows an infection or a vaccination. It is the most frequent demyelinating disorder of the CNS in children. In ...
M. Arrowsmith's user avatar
5 votes

ECT and retrograde amnesia

Permanent loss of memory seems only occur in the memory of the treatment and events leading up to the treatment. The results indicated that ECT can initially disrupt recall of events that occurred ...
Narusan's user avatar
  • 6,931
5 votes
Accepted

Biochemistry of (tap water) iontophoresis?

Tap‐water iontophoresis (TWI) using direct current (DC) is considered by some to be the most effective therapy in palmoplantar hyperhidrosis, although it is debated that botulinum toxin injections may ...
Chris Rogers's user avatar
  • 6,225
5 votes
Accepted

Does a unilateral total obstruction of the carotid artery cause brain damage?

Unilateral carotid compression (Carotid Compression Test) is an important procedure before performing vascular surgery for either of the carotid arteries, because during the surgery, they need to be ...
Narusan's user avatar
  • 6,931
5 votes
Accepted

Why do neurostimulators for DBS need to be implanted?

TL;DR: Placing it in the chest or abdomen actually makes perfect sense. There are several reasons why your ideas won't work, at least with current technologies. why not either a) have the pulses be ...
Carey Gregory's user avatar
  • 9,913
4 votes

Is possible that pain will start epileptic seizure?

There are several parts in your question. Does pain trigger epileptic seizure? To answer this question, it is essential to understand what is an epilepsy. An epilepsy arises when the normal ...
M. Arrowsmith's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Do all neurodegenerative diseases show up on an MRI scan?

Neurodegenerative diseases are diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms (memory impairment for Alzheimer Disease/ bradykinesia, tremor and rigor for Parkinson Disease) +/- neuropsychological tests. ...
M. Arrowsmith's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

What is the difference between Axon terminal and Synapses

If you have a look at one of the most famous reference book in neuroscience "Principles of neural science" by Kandel (Fifth Edition), on page 22: There is this figure: And here is the description of ...
S.Victor's user avatar
  • 905
4 votes
Accepted

Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's Disease

This is an interesting question. The role of deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease has increased in the last years. Recently, de Souza et al adressed your concern and reviewed studies ...
M. Arrowsmith's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Any research on brain's processes involved in evil actions?

When you put it that way... "...a cerebral circuit of evil..." ...no, that is absolutely ridiculous (no offense). In the human body (and generally in nature) there are only physical and ...
Antony's user avatar
  • 424
4 votes

Has tardive dyskinesia ever "gotten better?"

Tardive dyskinesia will, in many cases, get better after the offending drug is stopped. In severe cases, it is less common to have complete remission (where the symptoms completely disappear). But ...
wjdittmar's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Are aluminum profiles dangerous?

General rule of thumb: Reduce the amount of dirt and dust in the air you breathe. This question does currently not specify if those profiles are just handled and assembled in a bedroom. That should ...
LаngLаngС's user avatar
  • 6,908
3 votes

Which part of the body has the most nerve receptors?

If we are talking about Tactile corpuscle or Meissner's corpuscles and Lamellar corpuscle it would be the fingertips followed by lips. I did not find a reference in English, only a German: Die ...
bummi's user avatar
  • 354
3 votes

Why does prosopagnosia (face blindness) only affect recognition of faces?

Simply put, it doesn't. Breaking the word prosopagnosia down you end up with: Prosop is rooted in Greek for face, and gnosis is knowledge (agnosia is therefore lack of knowledge, or ignorance, but ...
Eric's user avatar
  • 366
3 votes

Antihypertensive as a treatment for Tourette's. (And Antihypotensive to make blood pressure normal?)

Following paper Tourette’s Disorder. Lyon, G.J., Shprecher, D., Coffey, B. et al. Curr Treat Options Neurol (2010) 12: 274. doi:10.1007/s11940-010-0073-x provides a good (somehow recent) review on ...
M. Arrowsmith's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Healthy way to become numb

These could be symptoms of different medical problems, depression, anxiety, or other issues. In lieu of personal advice or a discussion of treatments, I advise seeing your primary care provider as a ...
DoctorWhom's user avatar
  • 5,814
3 votes

How valid is the amyloid hypothesis in the causation of Alzheimer's disease?

It is now widely accepted that Alzheimer's disease is a form of cerebral amyloidosis (in fact the most common form of amyloidosis). The amyloidoses and prionoses are examples of protein misfolding ...
Chris's user avatar
  • 3,414
3 votes
Accepted

Can you change involuntary reactions?

Reflexes When it comes to physical reflexes, they are for the most part fixed. The link provided involves exploring a knee-reaction due to hitting the patellar tendon... "Okay, so I hit, and what ...
Dave Liu's user avatar
  • 4,876
3 votes

Is there a technical term for the phenomenon known as "brain zaps"?

Short answer: No. There is no technical term for "brain zaps." "Antidepressant discontinuation syndrome" accurately names the cause of brain zaps, but brain zaps are only one of many symptoms of ...
R. A.'s user avatar
  • 31
3 votes

Can sleeping too much damage the brain and heart?

Although this question is hard to research - you're dependent on self-reported data on sleeping hours, and there are many confounders that influence this relation (why do people sleep longer? maybe ...
Tami's user avatar
  • 466
3 votes
Accepted

Why aren't children affected by pins and needles as much as adults?

Pins and needles (paraesthesia in the medical jargon) is caused by compression of nerves and is nothing to do with blood flow or circulation (other than the very small blood vessels supplying the ...
Chris's user avatar
  • 3,414
3 votes

Biochemistry of (tap water) iontophoresis?

After some more research it looks like the answers to these questions are indeed still unknown. A recent 2018 article on Proposed mechanism of action of tap water iontophoresis for treatment of ...
bluenote10's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

What are ASDH and AS in the context of "cause of death"?

Several folks working together (Chris Rogers, agoodnurse, Carey Gregory) come to a consensus about this certificate as follows. CVA is virtually certain to be "Cerebrovascular Accident," ...
Diana Petitti's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

What's the name of the function that helps localise part of body without looking?

The term you are looking for is "proprioception". Briefly, it works because you have sensors in your own muscles and joints that can sense their stretch and position.
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 14.2k
2 votes

Stuttering problems

As a speech-language pathologist, I will say you should still see an SLP. While there is no "cure" for stuttering, an SLP can work on specific strategies tailored to you. Go to the American Speech-...
Katherine Lockwood's user avatar
2 votes

Is there a way to stimulate taste buds after stroke?

According to this case report, Testing should be considered if the patient is not meeting goals of rehabilitation, because altered taste perception may lead to depression, weight loss, and ...
Dave Liu's user avatar
  • 4,876

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible