26

The typical scenario of a seizure is: loss of consciousness uncontrolled movements recovery The conduct to adopt during each of these phases follows: During 1. and 2. The person will fall on the ground if standing and may get hurt, either due to the fall or due to the uncontrolled movements that will follow. The only things you can (and should) do at ...


11

This so-called sixth sense is called kinesthesia or proprioception. There are some slight differences between the two, in that kinesthesia only refers to moving parts, whereas your proprioceptive sense can identify the position of your body even when still. kin·es·the·sia awareness of the position and movement of the parts of the body by means of sensory ...


9

Well, you can do do various surgical procedures on nerves. You can suture a macroscopic nerve (i.e. a nerve that you can see) that has been injured. However, there are various problems that come with suturing an injured nerve. One of the main problems is that nerves are pretty unique histologically. Nerves comprise of the longest cells in the body with ...


8

Antidepressant Discontinuation Syndrome Affects approximately 20% of patients who experience abrupt discontinuation of an antidepressant that has been taken for at least 6 weeks. There are a myriad of symptoms including flu-like symptoms, insomnia, nausea, imbalance, sensory disturbances, and hyperarousal. The definitive cause of antidepressant ...


7

Yes (ish), this meta-analysis proved a strong correlation between exposure to pesticides and likelihood of developing Parkinson's. Note, there is no direct X level of exposure leads to Y likelihood, just a strong correlation. "Although the risk of PD increased with increased duration of exposure to pesticides, no significant dose-response relation was ...


7

Paresthesia Anxiety Symptoms -- seems like the term/condition you are looking for (though I am not a doctor and am not diagnosing you as such -- I'm just trying to inform you of the term you might be looking for). In this Wikipedia entry on Paresthesia, it describes the sensation as such: Paresthesia is an abnormal sensation such as tingling, tickling, ...


7

Receptive aphasia is a type of aphasia in which patients have difficulty understanding ("receiving") words as opposed to difficulty speaking them. There are more than one possible etiology and it is not diagnostic for a specific pathology, but may suggest something wrong with the temporal lobe due to epilepsy, TIA/stroke, brain damage, medication, or ...


6

I'll assume you're only asking about mechanoreceptors, else it gets too murky. Humans have four types of mechanoreceptors. Meissner corpuscle, innervated by RA1 (rapidly adapting type 1) nerve fibers. There are 2 of the fibers per square millimeter in the monkey finger (my source does not list it for humans), with 10 to 20 Meissner corpuscles per axon, ...


6

Caffeine Absorption Caffeine Capsules - 200mg - 84-120 minutes So maybe you took the caffeine, were already tired so you napped(2 hours or 120 minutes) just as it was kicking in full blown and then woke up a little later with the effects already in action, but not sleeping the full amount. Since the capsules take longer to kick in than liquids and ...


6

Yes. Most seizures are brief, resolving spontaneously within 1-2 minutes.1 These are rarely fatal. On the other hand, status epilepticus is not infrequently associated with death. Status epilepticus (sometime referred to in shorthand as just status) just means a prolonged seizure lasting at least 30 minutes. It can also refer to a situation that is ...


6

As a medical professional I find this very important question. No, OTC drugs are not any safer than drugs needing prescriptions. They are more dangerous. The rationale for this statement is that always when patients are given a prescription, a detailed dosing guidelines are given to patient. Also physicians make sure that the prescripted drug is suitable to ...


6

Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an inflammatory disorder, which often follows an infection or a vaccination. It is the most frequent demyelinating disorder of the CNS in children. In case of an infectious aetiology, some epidemiological studies suggest that ADEM is more frequently associated with upper respiratory tract infections in ...


5

What you are hearing about is probably based on two articles: Interaction of cinnamaldehyde and epicatechin with tau: implications of beneficial effects in modulating Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis Orally Administrated Cinnamon Extract Reduces β-Amyloid Oligomerization and Corrects Cognitive Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease Animal Models They led to ...


5

Steroids are used as treatment for acute attacks/flares in many diseases because they reduce inflammation. In multiple sclerosis, they are given to reduce inflammation of the nerves that occurs when the immune system attacks the nervous system. This inflammation may be one mechanism that causes the nerve damage in multiple sclerosis, although this seems to ...


5

The "fight or flight response" occurs under the control of the autonomic nervous system, which is to a great degree (but not completely) involuntary. The autonomic nervous system regulates certain body processes, such as blood pressure and the rate of breathing. This system works automatically (autonomously), without a person’s conscious effort. You can ...


5

You can't really put a number on it. There are so many edge cases that what counts as "a sense" is really a matter of opinion. For example: do you count proprioception (feedback about the locations of your body parts) as a sense, or is it not a sense because it doesn't provide information about your environment? Your body has distinct receptors for ...


5

The answer is "of course," but one must be careful about defining terms. Certainly the infection can persist for years in untreated patients. That qualifies as "chronic." There is no question that chronic Lyme disease exists as part of the natural history of Lyme disease. If you're asking whether the infectious agent can persist after what is normally a ...


5

Permanent loss of memory seems only occur in the memory of the treatment and events leading up to the treatment. The results indicated that ECT can initially disrupt recall of events that occurred many years previously, but recovery of these memories was virtually complete by seven months after treatment. It was also clear that persisting memory loss for ...


5

Tap‐water iontophoresis (TWI) using direct current (DC) is considered by some to be the most effective therapy in palmoplantar hyperhidrosis, although it is debated that botulinum toxin injections may be better (Wade, et al. 2018). How does TWI block sweat glands, and what are the side effects? The mechanism of action is unknown. It is hypothesised that an ...


5

Unilateral carotid compression (Carotid Compression Test) is an important procedure before performing vascular surgery for either of the carotid arteries, because during the surgery, they need to be compressed upstream for obvious reasons. Numbers vary, but in 6%1 to 26%2 of patients, the compensation through the circle of willis was insufficient: Forty ...


4

There are a number of possibilities, from benign to serious. Sweating is under the control of the sympathetic nervous system, as is vasodilation (facial redness). Anhydrosis of only one side of the face would be due dysfunction of the trigeminal nerve (which also carries sensory and motor components) on that side of the face. The trigeminal nerve can lose ...


4

There are several parts in your question. Does pain trigger epileptic seizure? To answer this question, it is essential to understand what is an epilepsy. An epilepsy arises when the normal pattern of neuronal activity is disturbed (ie the epileptogenic threshold is altered). This involves different cellular and molecular alterations: change in neuronal ...


4

Lowered brain activity in a PET scan isn't necessarily bad. It depends on what part of the brain is less active than usually and whether this is a permanent or transient state. Our brains are less active during sleep - that isn't a bad thing. Anyway, brain activity isn't just generally lowered during meditation. On the contrary. Functional brain mapping ...


4

How to identify migraine Traditionally, if you had headaches you would discuss your symptoms with a doctor who would then classify the type of headache you had based on what you reported. If you didn't think of something to report, or didn't think (for example) that your nausea was related to your headaches (and so didn't report it), then your headache type ...


4

You should read the article carefully. In the Introduction section they give some insight for their study: The majority of AD cases are sporadic in nature. The small fraction of familial cases are caused primarily by mutations in three genes: amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin1 (PS1), and presenilin 2 (PS2). They clearly specify what they are ...


4

Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease is something only a medical professional can do. However, the symptoms are often first observed by friends and family, and here is what the physician will look for: Significant memory problems in immediate recall, short-term, or long-term memory. Significant thinking deficits in at least one of four areas: expressing or ...


4

If you have a look at one of the most famous reference book in neuroscience "Principles of neural science" by Kandel (Fifth Edition), on page 22: There is this figure: And here is the description of the figure (extracts): Most neurons in the vertebrate nervous system have several main features in common. The cell body contains the nucleus, the ...


4

This is an interesting question. The role of deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease has increased in the last years. Recently, de Souza et al adressed your concern and reviewed studies investigating the timing of DBS in PD. Here are their conclusion: From the evidence available, we conclude that surgical management of PD alone or in combination ...


4

Neurodegenerative diseases are diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms (memory impairment for Alzheimer Disease/ bradykinesia, tremor and rigor for Parkinson Disease) +/- neuropsychological tests. The current role of neuroimaging in the diagnosis of neurogenerative diseases such as Parkinson Disease or Alzheimer Disease is mainly supportive, it can be ...


4

When you put it that way... "...a cerebral circuit of evil..." ...no, that is absolutely ridiculous (no offense). In the human body (and generally in nature) there are only physical and biochemical mechanisms. All behaviours that are described by the behavioural sciences (e.g. psychology) can be interpreted by biochemical mechanisms. For example, if ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible