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6

First, notice that bubbles are stopped by the drip chamber on the IV, or if there's an infusion pump instead of a drip chamber, the pump itself will detect it and stop the flow. If there is a small bubble or two in the line after the drip chamber or pump, notice that it doesn't go anywhere. It just sits there and doesn't move with the fluid so it never ...


2

I think you are looking for irrigation syringes - I'm familiar only with the curved variety but at least on a google images search I see straight ones as well. That said, I've always used luer-style syringes with an appropriate fitting when using syringes in an equipment context. Major catalog parts suppliers have plastic and metal fittings with just about ...


2

A vein that has undergone venipuncture woud be more dificult to extract blood because it is already traumatized/injured. Some veins would be thicker when healed and some would be friable. That's why they alternate arms for phlebotomy to allow your veins to heal. Experience wise, there's nothing much we can do about it. But i find it easier to extract blood ...


2

Larger needles aren't used to draw blood faster in general. They are used to avoid hemolysis. 16-18 gauge needles: A large needle (16 to 17 gauge) is used to minimize shearing forces that may physically damage red blood cells as they flow through the needle What maybe used to speed up the process is: Sqeezing your fists Tourniquets or blood ...


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There are a variety of syringes listed as "disposable catheter " that typically have a tapered straight tip. A common size is 60 ml . The tip is "universal" friction fit. I use them for G-tube feeding , they are standard for that application despite the name. I typically use them about 20 times. Then use them for purposes similar to in the question . In ...


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