6

According to this study, no. We conclude that no statistically significant overall association can be detected between milk and dairy product intake and symptoms of mucus production in healthy adults, either asymptomatic or symptomatic, with rhinovirus infection. It seems that you're already aware of this given your comment: I've also read elsewhere ...


4

Naturally, your nasal passageways and sinuses drain down into the back of your throat - and you swallow the drainage without even realizing it. In the diagram below, it's the oropharynx where your mouth and your nasal/sinus passageways come together. Sore throats are a common symptom of the common cold. You may notice the pain more when swallowing the ...


3

First, the definitions: A common cold (or "head cold") is a viral infection of the nose and throat. Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs. Tracheitis and bronchitis can be refered as a "chest cold" but not common cold (WebMD). Neither a common nor chest cold are necessary steps in developing pneumonia. You can get pneumonia without having a cold. Here's a ...


2

There are 4 sinuses : frontalis, ethmoid, maxillary, and sphenoid sinus. Frontal sinus, it excrete mucus into the meatus medius via a small opening called hiatus semilunaris anterior . Anterior and middle sinus of ethmoid also excrete mucus to meatus medius. The sphenoid sinus drainage to sphenoid recess. The two sinus drainage to meatus medius, but below ...


2

The following is for adults: Relationship between milk intake and mucus production in adult volunteers challenged with rhinovirus-2. (PubMed): In individuals inoculated with the common cold virus, milk intake was not associated with increased nasal secretions, symptoms of cough, nose symptoms or congestion.


1

In my experience keeping your nose blown (or even rinsed out) prevents a secondary infection in your throat. Whatever you don't blow out of your nose dribbles down the back of your throat and bacteria get happy there and give you a sore throat. This is technically a different second infection but most people will treat it as a single long cold that "moved ...


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