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CT scans use ionizing radiation. It's safe to get a CT scan for a medical purpose: the marginal risks of the scan are outweighed by the diagnostic benefits. However, repeated CT scans can potentially raise the risk of cancer. Monitoring ones progress in a fitness program can easily be done with other methods that do not cause cancer. I would consider it ...


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Toxicity of gadolinium-based contrast agents can generally be classified as acute (short term) and chronic (longer term) and include¹: Acute allergic-like reactions Acute physiologic reaction Chronic kidney injury (called nephrogenic systemic fibrosis) Additionally, there is evidence that a small amount of contrast agent is retained in various tissues of ...


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An xray is one image. Sometimes they might take a few more. CT and MRI scans are many more images. What's more, they aren't all taken from the same place, so you have to be moved into position a few times or the equipment needs to move around you or both. If contrast is needed, the whole thing needs to be done twice - once without and once with contrast. (Or ...


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It's indeed the same "big magnet" machine as for normal MRI, but in WB-MRI (ideally) multiple coils are placed on the patient's body, e.g.: The process does indeed last 30-60 minutes (as Carey noted) as multiple scans passes are made. (More technical details in the article linked.) There's a bit of history and/or variation in WB-MRI techniques ...


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I usually batch-convert DICOM files to jpegs using ImageJ (in Ubuntu). This way you can open multiple windows side-by-side. The size is also much smaller, for example, 3.9MB for all 7 upright MRI sequences of 32 slices each.


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In the case of your MRI, it's probably very simple: if you're lying on your side, you won't fit in the machine. There's nothing inherent in the MRI scanning process that requires any particular position. Rather, the MRI scanner is made as small as possible to improve imaging quality. The platform the patient lies on occupies the bottom of the imaging area, ...


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